Hurricane Preparedness Week is May 20-26

By: Patrap , 11:13 AM GMT on April 26, 2007



"Preparation through education is less costly than learning through tragedy."
- BILL PROENZA, DIRECTOR
NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER

This year Hurricane Preparedness Week is May 20-26, 2007

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HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS TIPS

History teaches that a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. By knowing your vulnerability and what actions you should take, you can reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster.


Hurricane hazards come in many forms: storm surge, high winds, tornadoes, and flooding. This means it is important for your family to have a plan that includes all of these hazards. Look carefully at the safety actions associated with each type of hurricane hazard and prepare your family disaster plan accordingly. But remember this is only a guide. The first and most important thing anyone should do when facing a hurricane threat is to use common sense.

You should be able to answer the following questions before a hurricane threatens:

*
What are the Hurricane Hazards?
*
What does it mean to you?
*
What actions should you take to be prepared?

Hurricanes and Your Health and Safety


* The great majority of injuries during a hurricane are cuts caused by flying glass or other debris. Other injuries include puncture wounds resulting from exposed nails, metal, or glass, and bone fractures.
* State and local health departments may issue health advisories or recommendations particular to local conditions. If in doubt, contact your local or state health department.
* Make sure to include all essential medications -- both prescription and over the counter -- in your family's emergency disaster kit.


* Hurricanes, especially if accompanied by a tidal surge or flooding, can contaminate the public water supply. Drinking contaminated water may cause illness. You cannot assume that the water in the hurricane-affected area is safe to drink.
* In the area hit by a hurricane, water treatment plants may not be operating; even if they are, storm damage and flooding can contaminate water lines. Listen for public announcements about the safety of the municipal water supply.
* If your well has been flooded, it needs to be tested and disinfected after the storm passes and the floodwaters recede. Questions about testing should be directed to your local or state health department.

Water Safety

* Use bottled water that has not been exposed to flood waters if it is available.
* If you don't have bottled water, you should boil water to make it safe. Boiling water will kill most types of disease-causing organisms that may be present. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for boiling. Boil the water for one minute, let it cool, and store it in clean containers with covers.
* If you can't boil water, you can disinfect it using household bleach. Bleach will kill some, but not all, types of disease-causing organisms that may be in the water. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for disinfection. Add 1/8 teaspoon (or 8 drops) of regular, unscented, liquid household bleach for each gallon of water, stir it well and let it stand for 30 minutes before you use it. Store disinfected water in clean containers with covers.
* If you have a well that has been flooded, the water should be tested and disinfected after flood waters recede. If you suspect that your well may be contaminated, contact your local or state health department or agriculture extension agent for specific advice.

Food Safety

* Do not eat any food that may have come into contact with flood water.
* Discard any food that is not in a waterproof container if there is any chance that it has come into contact with flood water. Food containers that are not waterproof include those with screw-caps, snap lids, pull tops, and crimped caps. Also, discard cardboard juice/milk/baby formula boxes and home canned foods if they have come in contact with flood water, because they cannot be effectively cleaned and sanitized.
* Inspect canned foods and discard any food in damaged cans. Can damage is shown by swelling; leakage; punctures; holes; fractures; extensive deep rusting; or crushing/denting severe enough to prevent normal stacking or opening with a manual, wheel-type can opener.
* Undamaged, commercially prepared foods in all-metal cans and retort pouches (for example, flexible, shelf-stable juice or seafood pouches) can be saved if you do the following:
o Remove the labels, if they are the removable kind, since they can harbor dirt and bacteria.
o Thoroughly wash the cans or retort pouches with soap and water, using hot water if it is available.
o Brush or wipe away any dirt or silt.
o Rinse the cans or retort pouches with water that is safe for drinking, if available, since dirt or residual soap will reduce the effectiveness of chlorine sanitation.
o Then, sanitize them by immersion in one of the two following ways:
+ place in water and allow the water to come to a boil and continue boiling for 2 minutes, or
+ place in a freshly-made solution consisting of 1 tablespoon of unscented liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available) for 15 minutes.
* Air dry cans or retort pouches for a minimum of 1 hour before opening or storing.
* If the labels were removable, then re-label your cans or retort pouches, including the expiration date (if available), with a marker.
* Food in reconditioned cans or retort pouches should be used as soon as possible, thereafter.
* Any concentrated baby formula in reconditioned, all-metal containers must be diluted with clean, drinking water.
* Thoroughly wash metal pans, ceramic dishes, and utensils (including can openers) with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize them by boiling in clean water or immersing them for 15 minutes in a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available).
* Thoroughly wash countertops with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize by applying a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available). Allow to air dry.

Frozen and Refrigerated Foods

* If you will be without power for a long period:
o ask friends to store your frozen foods in their freezers if they have electricity;
o see if freezer space is available in a store, church, school, or commercial freezer that has electrical service; or
o use dry ice, if available. Twenty-five pounds of dry ice will keep a ten-cubic-foot freezer below freezing for 3-4 days. Use care when handling dry ice, and wear dry, heavy gloves to avoid injury.
* Your refrigerator will keep foods cool for about four hours without power if it is unopened. Add block or dry ice to your refrigerator if the electricity will be off longer than four hours.
* Thawed food can usually be eaten if it is still "refrigerator cold," or re-frozen if it still contains ice crystals.
* To be safe, remember, "When in doubt, throw it out." Discard any food that has been at room temperature for two hours or more, and any food that has an unusual odor, color, or texture.

Sanitation and Hygiene

It is critical for you to remember to practice basic hygiene during the emergency period. Always wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected:

* before preparing or eating
* after toilet use
* after participating in cleanup activities; and
* after handling articles contaminated with floodwater or sewage.

If there is flooding along with a hurricane, the waters may contain fecal material from overflowing sewage systems and agricultural and industrial waste. Although skin contact with floodwater does not, by itself, pose a serious health risk, there is risk of disease from eating or drinking anything contaminated with floodwater.

If you have any open cuts or sores that will be exposed to floodwater, keep them as clean as possible by washing them with soap and applying an antibiotic ointment to discourage infection. If a wound develops redness, swelling, or drainage, seek immediate medical attention.

Do not allow children to play in floodwater areas. Wash children's hands frequently (always before meals), and do not allow children to play with floodwater-contaminated toys that have not been disinfected. You can disinfect toys using a solution of one cup of bleach in five gallons of water.

Immunizations

Outbreaks of communicable diseases after hurricanes are unusual. However, the rates of diseases that were present before a hurricane may increase because of a lack of sanitation or overcrowding in shelters. Increases in infectious diseases that were not present before the hurricane are not a problem, so mass vaccination programs are unnecessary.

If you have wounds, you should be evaluated for a tetanus immunization, just as you would at any other time of injury. If you receive a puncture wound or a wound contaminated with feces, soil, or saliva, have a doctor or health department determine whether a tetanus booster is necessary based on individual records.

Specific recommendations for vaccinations should be made on a case-by-case basis, or as determined by local and state health departments.

Mosquitoes

Rain and flooding in a hurricane area may lead to an increase in mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are most active at sunrise and sunset. In most cases, the mosquitoes will be pests but will not carry communicable diseases. It is unlikely that diseases which were not present in the area prior to the hurricane would be of concern. Local, state, and federal public health authorities will be actively working to control the spread of any mosquito-borne diseases.

To protect yourself from mosquitoes, use screens on dwellings, and wear clothes with long sleeves and long pants. Insect repellents that contain DEET are very effective. Be sure to read all instructions before using DEET. Care must be taken when using DEET on small children. Products containing DEET are available from stores and through local and state health departments.

To control mosquito populations, drain all standing water left in open containers outside your home.

Mental Health

The days and weeks after a hurricane are going to be rough. In addition to your physical health, you need to take some time to consider your mental health as well. Remember that some sleeplessness, anxiety, anger, hyperactivity, mild depression, or lethargy are normal, and may go away with time. If you feel any of these symptoms acutely, seek counseling. Remember that children need extra care and attention before, during, and after the storm. Be sure to locate a favorite toy or game for your child before the storm arrives to help maintain his/her sense of security. Your state and local health departments will help you find the local resources, including hospitals or health care providers, that you may need.

Seeking Assistance after a Hurricane

SEEKING DISASTER ASSISTANCE: Throughout the recovery period, it is important to monitor local radio or television reports and other media sources for information about where to get emergency housing, food, first aid, clothing, and financial assistance. The following section provides general information about the kinds of assistance that may be available.

DIRECT ASSISTANCE: Direct assistance to individuals and families may come from any number of organizations, including: the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army, and other volunteer organizations. These organizations provide food, shelter, supplies and assist in clean-up efforts.

THE FEDERAL ROLE: In the most severe disasters, the federal government is also called in to help individuals and families with temporary housing, counseling (for post-disaster trauma), low-interest loans and grants, and other assistance. The federal government also has programs that help small businesses and farmers.

Most federal assistance becomes available when the President of the United States declares a “Major Disaster” for the affected area at the request of a state governor. FEMA will provide information through the media and community outreach about federal assistance and how to apply.

Coping after a Hurricane Everyone who sees or experiences a hurricane is affected by it in some way. It is normal to feel anxious about your own safety and that of your family and close friends. Profound sadness, grief, and anger are normal reactions to an abnormal event. Acknowledging your feelings helps you recover. Focusing on your strengths and abilities helps you heal. Accepting help from community programs and resources is healthy. Everyone has different needs and different ways of coping. It is common to want to strike back at people who have caused great pain. Children and older adults are of special concern in the aftermath of disasters. Even individuals who experience a disaster “second hand” through exposure to extensive media coverage can be affected.

Contact local faith-based organizations, voluntary agencies, or professional counselors for counseling. Additionally, FEMA and state and local governments of the affected area may provide crisis counseling assistance.

Minimize this emotional and traumatic experience by being prepared, not scared and therefore you and your family will stay in control and survive a major hurricane.

SIGNS OF HURRICANE RELATED STRESS:

* Difficulty communicating thoughts.
* Difficulty sleeping.
* Difficulty maintaining balance in their lives.
* Low threshold of frustration.
* Increased use of drugs/alcohol.
* Limited attention span.
* Poor work performance.
* Headaches/stomach problems.
* Tunnel vision/muffled hearing.
* Colds or flu-like symptoms.
* Disorientation or confusion.
* Difficulty concentrating.
* Reluctance to leave home.
* Depression, sadness.
* Feelings of hopelessness.
* Mood-swings and easy bouts of crying.
* Overwhelming guilt and self-doubt.
* Fear of crowds, strangers, or being alone.

EASING HURRICANE RELATED STRESS:

* Talk with someone about your feelings - anger, sorrow, and other emotions - even though it may be difficult.
* Seek help from professional counselors who deal with post-disaster stress.
* Do not hold yourself responsible for the disastrous event or be frustrated because you feel you cannot help directly in the rescue work.
* Take steps to promote your own physical and emotional healing by healthy eating, rest, exercise, relaxation, and meditation.
* Maintain a normal family and daily routine, limiting demanding responsibilities on yourself and your family.
* Spend time with family and friends.
* Participate in memorials.
* Use existing support groups of family, friends, and religious institutions.
* Ensure you are ready for future events by restocking your disaster supplies kits and updating your family disaster plans

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The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

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226. Patrap
12:51 PM GMT on May 08, 2007
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
225. Patrap
12:08 PM GMT on May 08, 2007
Backo!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
224. Patrap
12:05 PM GMT on May 08, 2007
WTH?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
223. sandcrab39565
12:05 PM GMT on May 08, 2007
Morning Pat heads up Hurricane "Zora" on the way.lol THIS IS AN EXERCISE repeat THIS IS AN EXERCISE
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
222. Raysfan70
11:56 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
Pat is still having problems posting in his blog.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
221. SouthernLady
11:56 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
Pat, does your IP work this morning?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
220. Patrap
11:54 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
Bump
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
219. EmmyRose
11:51 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
YES YOU ARE BRO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
♥ to you and T
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
218. Patrap
11:51 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
ghg
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
217. Patrap
11:50 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
I AM Ironman
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
216. EmmyRose
11:46 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
Good Morning Pat
today Is the day
report back later
have a good one!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
215. BABYGURL
11:42 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
Morning Pat! Hope you have a great day and thanks for all the good hurricane advice in your blog! Where do you get dry ice from around here?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
214. Raysfan70
9:51 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
{{Pat}}
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
213. anvilhead
4:06 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
what happened did u really post that comment PT? why has WUBA fallen because of a few IP adresses not working?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
212. weatherboykris
4:01 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
I've seen worse.Of course,it was mostly from...well...Rand,LOL.irony.other than that, not gonna comment on that.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
210. Barefootontherocks
2:15 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
Pat, Last time this happened I think it was people on certain ESPs, LOLO me... ISPs who could not get on. Was resolved within a day or two.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
209. WSI
2:14 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
Trying going here...

http://64.243.174.104/


Will try to e-mail you the info too.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
208. Patrap
2:04 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
Im having a server connection problem folks. Every time I try to access wunderground.com.It dosent load at all..and I time out on connection. Anyone who has any Ideas,..contact Patrap at pjp1201@bellsouth.net. Im on neighbors PC. Thanks. Im running Firefox2
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
207. Barefootontherocks
2:03 AM GMT on May 08, 2007
Hi Pat. Thanks for your beautiful contribution to the cityscapes. More welcomed any time. He's a little local cutie for ya!

J42: Newest member of J-pod confirmed May 2, 2007
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
205. EmmyRose
7:46 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
Pat my friend mentioned a musician who was 103 years old that Jazzfest was honoring? Do you know of this person>
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204. Patrap
7:46 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
Total Jazz fest attendance..2 weekends..6 days..375,000
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
203. Patrap
7:44 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
All the vendors were there this year and last. They made sure the food would be here last year. This year it was just bigger. The soft shell crab po-boy..slideshow Link
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
201. EmmyRose
7:36 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
I am blessed to be surrounded
by "wise numbers" altho we
dwindled by one today

but the masses are another story
for another time.

I choose to think of her
as above reproach.

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
200. Patrap
7:34 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
Those days can be hard ones Emmy. Your friend sounds wise, Comfort is found in numbers.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
199. EmmyRose
7:32 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
Ran into a friend of mine
today at a funeral
She just came back
from New Orleans where
she was working on
a documentary on it.

She told me wonderful tales
in between our tears.
But we sadly buried a friend
we sadly buried someone with
dignity - one less person on this
earth who gets it.....
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
198. Patrap
6:53 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
I bought some sausage from them.Excellent
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197. Patrap
6:53 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
Yeah..they been round long time.
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195. Patrap
6:08 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
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194. Patrap
4:57 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
LSU WAVCIS...Link
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193. star75
12:42 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketGRAZIE PAT!amico gentile,un bel giorno a te e family!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
192. Patrap
12:33 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
Attendence Jazzfest total..2 weekends,6 days...375,000
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
191. sandcrab39565
12:32 PM GMT on May 07, 2007
Morning Pat looks like the JF was a success once again. Nice pics
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
190. Raysfan70
9:46 AM GMT on May 07, 2007
{{PAtrap and Family}}
myspace layouts, myspace codes, glitter graphics
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
189. Patrap
6:31 PM GMT on May 06, 2007
That night, Plant joined Lil' Band O' Gold onstage at Tipitina's for a six-song, 30-minute set. They reprised Domino's "It Keeps Raining" and "I've Been Around." They covered "Sea of Love," a 1959 hit for Lake Charles songwriter Phil Phillips that Plant later remade with the Honeydrippers, as well as Elvis Presley's "Love Me" and "One Night."

The highlight? Plant singing bits of "Whole Lotta Love" and "Black Dog" as Lil' Band O' Gold vamped on "Hoochie Coochie Man" and "Shake Your Hips.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
187. Patrap
6:27 PM GMT on May 06, 2007
Hello BOTR..was great party Saturday.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
186. Patrap
6:27 PM GMT on May 06, 2007
Used to do the Tickfaw tubing thing years ago CK. Ill check it out one weekend.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
185. Barefootontherocks
6:13 PM GMT on May 06, 2007
Morning. Happy Sunday. Thanks for the reports and photos from Jazz Fest.
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184. cajunkid
6:01 PM GMT on May 06, 2007
Patrap, you should go out here one weekend...its fun! Link
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
183. Patrap
5:41 PM GMT on May 06, 2007
Keith Spera
He found his thrill
Former Led Zeppelin frontman Robert Plant is a music legend in his own right. But the honor was all his during a trip to New Orleans to record a few songs for a Fats Domino tribute CD.
Saturday, May 05, 2007
By Keith Spera

The silver guitar shimmered, shadowed by an accordion, as a familiar voice wrapped itself in the mournful opening lines:

" It keeps raining and raining oh, tears from my eyes,Since you've gone, all I do is cry."

The rest of Lil' Band o' Gold swung in behind the voice, trotting out Fats Domino's "It Keeps Raining" for a southwest Louisiana spin.


8





Two-and-a-half minutes later, the singer allowed himself a bit of fun, stamping his signature on the song's conclusion: "Eeewww, yeah, mama!"

Robert Plant grinned, pleased with himself and his new Louisiana buddies.

Eight days before the start of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, the former Led Zeppelin frontman flew into New Orleans to work on a Fats Domino tribute album.

He joined a roster of marquee names -- Paul McCartney, Elton John, Tom Petty, Tim McGraw, Norah Jones, Lenny Kravitz, B.B. King, Willie Nelson, Randy Newman -- who have either recorded, or committed to record, Domino songs.

Proceeds from the tribute album, scheduled for a fall release on Vanguard Records, will benefit the Tipitina's Foundation.

Established in 2004, the nonprofit foundation has greatly expanded its mission since Hurricane Katrina. More than $1 million has been raised to assist New Orleans musicians and train the next generation. Recently, the foundation donated $100,000 to rebuild Domino's flooded home in the Lower 9th Ward. The Domino tribute CD is the foundation's most ambitious undertaking to date.

When possible, the foundation's Bill Taylor and Adam Shipley paired marquee artists with Louisiana musicians. McCartney will sing over Allen Toussaint's band on "I Want to Walk You Home." Lenny Kravitz collaborated with the Rebirth Brass Band, Troy "Trombone Shorty" Andrews and James Brown's JB horns for "Whole Lotta Loving." B.B. King cut "Goin' Home" over a foundation laid by Ivan Neville's DumpstaPhunk. Willie Nelson's "I Hear You Knocking " features Jon Cleary on keyboards. For his part, Plant jumped at the chance to hang out in south Louisiana for a week.

"I wanted a vacation," he said one afternoon at the Music Shed, a converted warehouse studio in the Lower Garden District. "I wanted to get up to no good somewhere.

"Seriously, I think the sentiment and rationale behind (the Domino tribute) makes absolute sense. I've been to his house. You've got to rebuild and do it quick and get the community back in there before it becomes some major new development for something unholy.






"So I think it's a good idea. I'm glad to be here. You have to be humbled when you see what people are having to deal with."

. . . . . . .

As a boy growing up in England, Plant was smitten with the music of New Orleans. He devoured the latest singles by Bobby Marchan, Frankie Ford and Chris Kenner.

"Bear in mind that in the post-war U.K., it was quite dull," he said. "All we had on a rock 'n' roll level were imitators of American rockabilly or crooners. To hear all that stuff from one town . . .

"Fats Domino was having huge records in the U.K. I thought it was very appealing. It didn't have the sexuality of Elvis Presley or the 'watch out' stuff that a lot of the rockers had, or the sort of Esquerita wildness. His voice was so charming and endearing."

Along with Chicago, New Orleans represented the epitome of exotic American music to Plant.

"I was intoxicated by the sound of New Orleans," he said. "By the way that a 12-bar blues would resolve, the way that the piano would have these little tags, which are classic New Orleans tags. "I never guessed at the age of 14 that by the time I was 21, I'd be actually raging around New Orleans, looking for clues. But that's how it turned out."

In the early 1970s, as Led Zeppelin evolved into the world's biggest rock band, New Orleans was a preferred destination.

"When I came here in Led Zep, it was still only about the music," he said. "When I got here, I realized that the culture was just so radically different than anything else I could imagine in the whole of the United States. It was a different country, really.


"I was very impressed. I started reading up on it. I could feel something different here, something that was still alive, that hadn't been too Americanized and too messed with."

Suffice to say, the city lived up to his expectations.

"Way beyond that. I found it exotic, frightening, a little bit intimidating. Mostly I felt quite ignorant. That didn't stop Led Zeppelin from having the greatest parties on Earth with Earl King, Ernie K-Doe, Professor Longhair, the Meters. (Atlantic Records founder) Ahmet Ertegun, our glorious leader, would hire Snooks Eaglin or somebody, and his wife would negotiate for extra time for extra money.

"Just the adventure of New Orleans . . . by the time we finished doing a gig here and taking a day off, most people would have to go into a rest home for a month to get over it. But we had a lot of good friends, and I have some fantastic memories of the exaggerations here."

. . . . . . .

Given that history, Plant was easily lured to town for the Domino project.

After learning that Plant was interested, Tipitina's Foundation music director Adam Shipley suggested he record with Lil' Band O' Gold. "I didn't really have any concept at all," Plant said. "Adam Shipley sent me a CD of Lil' Band O' Gold, and I liked what I heard. I liked it even more when I walked in the studio, because they were all playing at the same time, and it was chaos.

"It's great that in this area, the past is right up level with the present. It's local music for people who understand it. It's how it ought to be. It isn't some guy coming down from a lofty perch in L.A. talking about his car and the bling and a gun."

Plant consulted a list of Domino songs reserved by other artists and selected two lesser-known tracks, "I've Been Around" and "It Keeps Rainin'."


"I looked down the list and they hadn't been chosen," he said. "I couldn't believe it."

When Plant realized the 26-voice Soweto Gospel Choir would be in New Orleans at the same time as him, he asked to record an additional Domino song, "Valley of Tears," with them.

In preliminary discussions with Lil' Band O' Gold frontman C.C. Adcock, Plant proposed they channel the feel of south Louisiana fiddler Cleveland Crochet's 1961 recording of "Sugar Bee" and other singles from Goldband Records. To that end, Adcock rounded up vintage gear from Lafayette and set it up at the Music Shed.

Led Zeppelin chiseled heavy blues-rock epics of 10 minutes or more. Plant hoped to limit his Domino recordings to three minutes or less, in keeping with the spirit of the originals.

"You can't do 'Dazed and Confused' with a Fats song, can you?" he said. "You can't get the violin bow out for that."

. . . . . . .6

Plant turned up at the Music Shed around noon April 19, after arriving the previous night from New York. His entourage consisted of one woman from his management company. The Robert Plant of legend was a larger-than-life character whose hedonistic exploits generated more than a few tall tales. But he came across as unpretentious, witty, occasionally self-deprecating and, above all, focused on the task at hand. He treated the musicians and Music Shed staff as peers.

As a multimillionaire with nothing left to prove, Plant roams the globe in search of collaborators who excite him, be they traditional drummers in Mali or a swamp pop band from Lafayette.

He arrived at the Music Shed ready to work. "I've done all my homework," he said.






He and Lil' Band O' Gold tackled "It Keeps Raining" first. They recorded the old-school way, with everyone singing and playing together in the same room.

With reading glasses propped on his nose, Plant peered at a lyric sheet, then swiveled his hips and nodded his head, losing himself in the groove. Adcock's guitar teamed with Steve Riley's accordion against a backdrop of saxophones and the pulse of Warren Storm's drums.

After a take, the band tramped into the studio's control room, a space no bigger than a child's bedroom, to listen to a playback. As the second take lifted off, the group emitted a collective "ohhh" and exchanged smiles.

"That's what I came in for," Plant said to the others. "The feel is there. We're talking to each other when we're playing. And it's still under two-and-a-half minutes."

He preferred his vocal on the first take, the rest of the band on the second take. He suggested using ProTools software to transfer his voice from one to the other.

"That's illegal down here," Adcock said. Plant boasts an encyclopedic knowledge of vinyl records from the 1950s and 1960s, especially Louisiana music. While in New Orleans, he planned to hunt for vintage 45s at the Louisiana Music Factory and Jim Russell Rare Records. He told Adcock that he was especially interested in the Par Lo label.

"Do you mean Paula Records?" said Adcock, referring to the Shreveport label.

No, Plant insisted, Par Lo: "The first label that Aaron Neville recorded for. It has an orange, black and white label."


(Neville actually recorded for Minit before releasing "Tell It Like It Is" on Par Lo in 1966 -- but the label is, in fact, orange, black and white).

As the afternoon wore on, Plant asked when lunch would be served. After they finished recording, answered Adam Shipley, because a big meal might slow down their metabolism.

"A man of my age, I'd be having a nap," Plant agreed.

"I'd be right there with you, my brother," Shipley said.

"No you wouldn't," Plant responded, as Shipley turned red and the other musicians cracked up.

For Tipitina's Foundation director Bill Taylor, Plant's visit fell during a crazy week. The previous Friday, Taylor was in Las Vegas with B.B. King and longtime Fats Domino saxophonist Herb Hardesty. After a few days back in New Orleans, he left for Los Angeles, where Randy Newman recorded "Blue Monday" and the Skatalites laid down "Be My Guest" with Ben Harper.

The Domino project, he realized, was now a reality. "At a certain point, you turn a corner where it's no longer you begging people, and it stands on its own as a living breathing, thing," Taylor said. "We're past the point where it's just a concept. The momentum is there."

The Plant session with Lil' Band O' Gold fulfilled the concept.

"Whenever we could, we involved New Orleans musicians," Taylor said. "There's something about Fats' material that naturally creates this amazing vibe. The songs are so spirited. They bring you right in.






"That ambiance has been present at every recording session. Not one session has been remotely awkward."

. . . . . . .

As the afternoon at the Music Shed wore on, Plant and Lil' Band O' Gold turned their attention to "I've Been Around."

"We've got to sort out whether to tidy it up," Plant said. "Make so it's swinging, but you don't want any conflict."

"I'll get a thinner guitar tone," Adcock said.

Plant offered a specific suggestion: "You need a Matt Murphy type of sound. The horns are great at the end. We should do that earlier. That crescendo sounds like the stuff that Memphis Slim did with Vee-Jay Records, 'Lend Me Your Love' and all that."

"Start off cool and James Dean," Adcock instructed, "then unload the shotgun at the end." Plant, who can do a spot-on Elvis impersonation, did not want to mimic Domino's vocals too closely on "I've Been Around."

"I'm doing away with some of the pop melody by swinging it and breaking the melody down," he said.

"To me, it's a pure pop song," Adcock said. "This is blasphemy to say, but when I hear the song, I don't know if they fleshed it out the night they recorded it. It sounds like there's more to it than what they actually got out of it, which is very rare for Fats and that crew.


"But after so many hits, I guess you just start taking them for granted. We don't have the problem of having to trump a classic."

The group broke for soul food -- greens, cornbread, fried chicken and catfish, macaroni and cheese, pork chops -- then listened to the playbacks once again.

Satisfied, and eager to hit the record shops, Plant took off.

. . . . . . .

At the Louisiana Music Factory on Decatur Street, he stocked up on DVDs, books and local CDs. Later that night, he caught Steve Riley's other band, the Mamou Playboys, at the Mid-City Lanes Rock 'n' Bowl.

"Initially people didn't recognize him," said Mid-City Lanes owner John Blancher. "He looked like a tourist who comes to see zydeco. He hung out by the jukebox."

The young members of Cajun band T'Canaille were star-struck. Plant also signed an autograph for a bartender's mother and insisted on paying for a Rock 'n' Bowl T-shirt that Blancher offered him for free. After Rock 'n' Bowl, Plant ate at Dick and Jenny's, then caught the Soweto Gospel Choir at Tipitina's. At first he listened from the balcony, which was closed to the public. Then he materialized in the crowd alongside the bar.

His big night ended at the Maple Leaf, with keyboardist Ivan Neville, drummer Johnny Vidacovich and Meters bassist George Porter Jr.

The next day, he returned to the Music Shed to record "Valley of Tears" with the Soweto Gospel Choir. On April 21, Plant met Fats Domino himself at the Music Shed.


"I thought he was charming, affable, probably a little bit intimidated with the number of people who flocked around him," Plant said. "That's a horrible feeling. If you know what you do is OK, you don't need to have it indemnified by 30 people who want a photo opportunity."

That night, Plant joined Lil' Band O' Gold onstage at Tipitina's for a six-song, 30-minute set. They reprised Domino's "It Keeps Raining" and "I've Been Around." They covered "Sea of Love," a 1959 hit for Lake Charles songwriter Phil Phillips that Plant later remade with the Honeydrippers, as well as Elvis Presley's "Love Me" and "One Night."

The highlight? Plant singing bits of "Whole Lotta Love" and "Black Dog" as Lil' Band O' Gold vamped on "Hoochie Coochie Man" and "Shake Your Hips."

From Tipitina's, he paid a quick visit to the Spotted Cat on Frenchmen Street. The next day, he left for two days in Lafayette, with Adcock as his host.

"C.C. Adcock was like my greatest new best friend," Plant said. "I think he's a fantastic guy. His hospitality, and the initiation into weekend life in Lafayette, was fantastic. I don't want to go back to England."

Back in New Orleans on April 24, Plant dined at Jacques-Imo's and stopped by the Rebirth Brass Band at the Maple Leaf. The next day, he returned to the Music Shed, where he taped interviews with producer T-Bone Burnett and singer Alison Krauss. That night, he saw Angelique Kidjo at the House of Blues.

He finally flew out of town on April 26, the day before the start of Jazzfest. Back home in England, soccer season beckoned.

On his final afternoon in New Orleans, Plant reflected on his south Louisiana sojourn. Was he satisfied?

"No. I need to be here for about six months to get on the trail of what I'm looking for," he said. "But I had a wonderful time. It was just like peeking through the keyhole."
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
182. Patrap
5:33 PM GMT on May 06, 2007
Hey Bug!,.. it was a rocking and swooning Saturday here yesterday for sure...
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
181. Patrap
5:32 PM GMT on May 06, 2007
Fred is the Jester to Fats Domino here Emmy..Hes Our King. Robert Plant spent a week with Fats Domino cutting a track or two for Fats new Tribute CD. That was in the Living section yesterday with great pic of Plant & Fats..Ill scan it later and try to dig up the article. Paul McCartney,Steely Dan laid down some tracks with Him recently too.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
180. EmmyRose
4:12 PM GMT on May 06, 2007
♥ thanks Pat
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
179. palmettobug53
3:49 PM GMT on May 06, 2007
Pat! How ya doin'? got a jazz fest going on, huh? Cool!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
178. auburn (Mod)
2:39 PM GMT on May 06, 2007
Patrap Motel...come one come all...camping on the lawn
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
177. EmmyRose
2:36 PM GMT on May 06, 2007
Tell me the Fred story AGAIN Pat
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:

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