Preparing for Hurricane Season

By: Patrap , 9:08 PM GMT on April 08, 2007

5
HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS TIPS



Hurricanes and Your Health and Safety


* The great majority of injuries during a hurricane are cuts caused by flying glass or other debris. Other injuries include puncture wounds resulting from exposed nails, metal, or glass, and bone fractures.
* State and local health departments may issue health advisories or recommendations particular to local conditions. If in doubt, contact your local or state health department.
* Make sure to include all essential medications -- both prescription and over the counter -- in your family's emergency disaster kit.


* Hurricanes, especially if accompanied by a tidal surge or flooding, can contaminate the public water supply. Drinking contaminated water may cause illness. You cannot assume that the water in the hurricane-affected area is safe to drink.
* In the area hit by a hurricane, water treatment plants may not be operating; even if they are, storm damage and flooding can contaminate water lines. Listen for public announcements about the safety of the municipal water supply.
* If your well has been flooded, it needs to be tested and disinfected after the storm passes and the floodwaters recede. Questions about testing should be directed to your local or state health department.

Water Safety

* Use bottled water that has not been exposed to flood waters if it is available.
* If you don't have bottled water, you should boil water to make it safe. Boiling water will kill most types of disease-causing organisms that may be present. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for boiling. Boil the water for one minute, let it cool, and store it in clean containers with covers.
* If you can't boil water, you can disinfect it using household bleach. Bleach will kill some, but not all, types of disease-causing organisms that may be in the water. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for disinfection. Add 1/8 teaspoon (or 8 drops) of regular, unscented, liquid household bleach for each gallon of water, stir it well and let it stand for 30 minutes before you use it. Store disinfected water in clean containers with covers.
* If you have a well that has been flooded, the water should be tested and disinfected after flood waters recede. If you suspect that your well may be contaminated, contact your local or state health department or agriculture extension agent for specific advice.

Food Safety

* Do not eat any food that may have come into contact with flood water.
* Discard any food that is not in a waterproof container if there is any chance that it has come into contact with flood water. Food containers that are not waterproof include those with screw-caps, snap lids, pull tops, and crimped caps. Also, discard cardboard juice/milk/baby formula boxes and home canned foods if they have come in contact with flood water, because they cannot be effectively cleaned and sanitized.
* Inspect canned foods and discard any food in damaged cans. Can damage is shown by swelling; leakage; punctures; holes; fractures; extensive deep rusting; or crushing/denting severe enough to prevent normal stacking or opening with a manual, wheel-type can opener.
* Undamaged, commercially prepared foods in all-metal cans and retort pouches (for example, flexible, shelf-stable juice or seafood pouches) can be saved if you do the following:
o Remove the labels, if they are the removable kind, since they can harbor dirt and bacteria.
o Thoroughly wash the cans or retort pouches with soap and water, using hot water if it is available.
o Brush or wipe away any dirt or silt.
o Rinse the cans or retort pouches with water that is safe for drinking, if available, since dirt or residual soap will reduce the effectiveness of chlorine sanitation.
o Then, sanitize them by immersion in one of the two following ways:
+ place in water and allow the water to come to a boil and continue boiling for 2 minutes, or
+ place in a freshly-made solution consisting of 1 tablespoon of unscented liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available) for 15 minutes.
* Air dry cans or retort pouches for a minimum of 1 hour before opening or storing.
* If the labels were removable, then re-label your cans or retort pouches, including the expiration date (if available), with a marker.
* Food in reconditioned cans or retort pouches should be used as soon as possible, thereafter.
* Any concentrated baby formula in reconditioned, all-metal containers must be diluted with clean, drinking water.
* Thoroughly wash metal pans, ceramic dishes, and utensils (including can openers) with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize them by boiling in clean water or immersing them for 15 minutes in a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available).
* Thoroughly wash countertops with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize by applying a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available). Allow to air dry.

Frozen and Refrigerated Foods

* If you will be without power for a long period:
o ask friends to store your frozen foods in their freezers if they have electricity;
o see if freezer space is available in a store, church, school, or commercial freezer that has electrical service; or
o use dry ice, if available. Twenty-five pounds of dry ice will keep a ten-cubic-foot freezer below freezing for 3-4 days. Use care when handling dry ice, and wear dry, heavy gloves to avoid injury.
* Your refrigerator will keep foods cool for about four hours without power if it is unopened. Add block or dry ice to your refrigerator if the electricity will be off longer than four hours.
* Thawed food can usually be eaten if it is still "refrigerator cold," or re-frozen if it still contains ice crystals.
* To be safe, remember, "When in doubt, throw it out." Discard any food that has been at room temperature for two hours or more, and any food that has an unusual odor, color, or texture.

Sanitation and Hygiene

It is critical for you to remember to practice basic hygiene during the emergency period. Always wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected:

* before preparing or eating
* after toilet use
* after participating in cleanup activities; and
* after handling articles contaminated with floodwater or sewage.

If there is flooding along with a hurricane, the waters may contain fecal material from overflowing sewage systems and agricultural and industrial waste. Although skin contact with floodwater does not, by itself, pose a serious health risk, there is risk of disease from eating or drinking anything contaminated with floodwater.

If you have any open cuts or sores that will be exposed to floodwater, keep them as clean as possible by washing them with soap and applying an antibiotic ointment to discourage infection. If a wound develops redness, swelling, or drainage, seek immediate medical attention.

Do not allow children to play in floodwater areas. Wash children's hands frequently (always before meals), and do not allow children to play with floodwater-contaminated toys that have not been disinfected. You can disinfect toys using a solution of one cup of bleach in five gallons of water.

Immunizations

Outbreaks of communicable diseases after hurricanes are unusual. However, the rates of diseases that were present before a hurricane may increase because of a lack of sanitation or overcrowding in shelters. Increases in infectious diseases that were not present before the hurricane are not a problem, so mass vaccination programs are unnecessary.

If you have wounds, you should be evaluated for a tetanus immunization, just as you would at any other time of injury. If you receive a puncture wound or a wound contaminated with feces, soil, or saliva, have a doctor or health department determine whether a tetanus booster is necessary based on individual records.

Specific recommendations for vaccinations should be made on a case-by-case basis, or as determined by local and state health departments.

Mosquitoes

Rain and flooding in a hurricane area may lead to an increase in mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are most active at sunrise and sunset. In most cases, the mosquitoes will be pests but will not carry communicable diseases. It is unlikely that diseases which were not present in the area prior to the hurricane would be of concern. Local, state, and federal public health authorities will be actively working to control the spread of any mosquito-borne diseases.

To protect yourself from mosquitoes, use screens on dwellings, and wear clothes with long sleeves and long pants. Insect repellents that contain DEET are very effective. Be sure to read all instructions before using DEET. Care must be taken when using DEET on small children. Products containing DEET are available from stores and through local and state health departments.

To control mosquito populations, drain all standing water left in open containers outside your home.

Mental Health

The days and weeks after a hurricane are going to be rough. In addition to your physical health, you need to take some time to consider your mental health as well. Remember that some sleeplessness, anxiety, anger, hyperactivity, mild depression, or lethargy are normal, and may go away with time. If you feel any of these symptoms acutely, seek counseling. Remember that children need extra care and attention before, during, and after the storm. Be sure to locate a favorite toy or game for your child before the storm arrives to help maintain his/her sense of security. Your state and local health departments will help you find the local resources, including hospitals or health care providers, that you may need.

Seeking Assistance after a Hurricane

SEEKING DISASTER ASSISTANCE: Throughout the recovery period, it is important to monitor local radio or television reports and other media sources for information about where to get emergency housing, food, first aid, clothing, and financial assistance. The following section provides general information about the kinds of assistance that may be available.

DIRECT ASSISTANCE: Direct assistance to individuals and families may come from any number of organizations, including: the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army, and other volunteer organizations. These organizations provide food, shelter, supplies and assist in clean-up efforts.

THE FEDERAL ROLE: In the most severe disasters, the federal government is also called in to help individuals and families with temporary housing, counseling (for post-disaster trauma), low-interest loans and grants, and other assistance. The federal government also has programs that help small businesses and farmers.

Most federal assistance becomes available when the President of the United States declares a “Major Disaster” for the affected area at the request of a state governor. FEMA will provide information through the media and community outreach about federal assistance and how to apply.

Coping after a Hurricane Everyone who sees or experiences a hurricane is affected by it in some way. It is normal to feel anxious about your own safety and that of your family and close friends. Profound sadness, grief, and anger are normal reactions to an abnormal event. Acknowledging your feelings helps you recover. Focusing on your strengths and abilities helps you heal. Accepting help from community programs and resources is healthy. Everyone has different needs and different ways of coping. It is common to want to strike back at people who have caused great pain. Children and older adults are of special concern in the aftermath of disasters. Even individuals who experience a disaster “second hand” through exposure to extensive media coverage can be affected.

Contact local faith-based organizations, voluntary agencies, or professional counselors for counseling. Additionally, FEMA and state and local governments of the affected area may provide crisis counseling assistance.

Minimize this emotional and traumatic experience by being prepared, not scared and therefore you and your family will stay in control and survive a major hurricane.

SIGNS OF HURRICANE RELATED STRESS:

* Difficulty communicating thoughts.
* Difficulty sleeping.
* Difficulty maintaining balance in their lives.
* Low threshold of frustration.
* Increased use of drugs/alcohol.
* Limited attention span.
* Poor work performance.
* Headaches/stomach problems.
* Tunnel vision/muffled hearing.
* Colds or flu-like symptoms.
* Disorientation or confusion.
* Difficulty concentrating.
* Reluctance to leave home.
* Depression, sadness.
* Feelings of hopelessness.
* Mood-swings and easy bouts of crying.
* Overwhelming guilt and self-doubt.
* Fear of crowds, strangers, or being alone.

EASING HURRICANE RELATED STRESS:

* Talk with someone about your feelings - anger, sorrow, and other emotions - even though it may be difficult.
* Seek help from professional counselors who deal with post-disaster stress.
* Do not hold yourself responsible for the disastrous event or be frustrated because you feel you cannot help directly in the rescue work.
* Take steps to promote your own physical and emotional healing by healthy eating, rest, exercise, relaxation, and meditation.
* Maintain a normal family and daily routine, limiting demanding responsibilities on yourself and your family.
* Spend time with family and friends.
* Participate in memorials.
* Use existing support groups of family, friends, and religious institutions.
* Ensure you are ready for future events by restocking your disaster supplies kits and updating your family disaster plan.

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The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

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112. GulfScotsman
4:19 PM GMT on April 11, 2007
"captn.. we are caught in a political plasma storm... I dinne think we can hold orbit.... and transporters are down...."


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111. Patrap
1:13 PM GMT on April 11, 2007
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110. Patrap
12:50 PM GMT on April 11, 2007
More From The Times-Picayune | Subscribe To The Times-Picayune
White House resists plan for 72-mile storm shield
Denying Terrebonne project would be mistake, Vitter says
Wednesday, April 11, 2007
By Bill Walsh

WASHINGTON -- The White House has quietly signaled its opposition to a 72-mile levee system in south Louisiana proposed to protect about 120,000 people who have watched the Gulf of Mexico creep ever closer to their homes as the coast erodes.

The Bush administration raises concerns about the $900 million project in a draft policy paper being circulated on Capitol Hill as the House of Representatives prepares to consider legislation that would authorize construction.

The president stopped short of threatening a veto. But his opposition could delay the long-awaited Water Resources Development Act or scuttle the snaking system of levees and floodgates that has been on the drawing board for 15 years to protect people and property in Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes.






"If this policy statement is allowed to stand, it will display a fundamental lack of understanding and commitment to crucial hurricane and flood protection in key parts of southeast Louisiana," Sen. David Vitter, R-La., wrote in a letter to the president. "I urge you in the strongest possible terms to correct this mistake."

An administration spokesman soft-pedaled its concerns about the so-called Morganza-to-the-Gulf project, saying the policy is still in draft form. A final version could be issued as early as next week if, as expected, the House takes up the water resources bill when it returns from recess.

"At this point, to say there is a concern is probably premature," said Sean Kevelighan, spokesman for the Office of Management and Budget. "The legislation is under review right now."

But a draft version of the administration's position was unequivocal. It called for deleting the Morganza project from the bill.

"The project requires reformulation based on an analysis that reflects recent storm data, substantial cost increases, and the effects of other levees proposed south of Houma, and that assesses how it would affect the limited options available for restoring the ecosystem of the Terrebonne Basin," the document says.

It also calls for reducing federal financing for broader coastal restoration to $500 million and forcing the state to pay 50 percent of the overall costs, which Vitter labeled "a raw deal for Louisiana." The Blanco administration has estimated that restoring the coast, which is eroding through manmade and natural forces at a rate of 30 square miles per year and lost an estimated 217 square miles because of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, would cost in excess of $14 billion.

In their draft policy statement, Bush administration officials say they support coastal restoration in Louisiana, but "we would encourage the House to instead enact a broad, more flexible authorization." The Army Corps of Engineers began studying hurricane protection for Houma and the communities to the south in Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes in 1992. Plans were drawn for a 72-mile earthen levee system, with 12 floodgates and a canal lock in Houma. It was intended to protect 120,000 residents of south Louisiana and 1,700 square miles of marshes, farmland, residential communities and industrial sites.

Terrebonne Parish passed a local sales tax to help foot the bill for the plan, which in 2006 was estimated to cost $886.7 million, according to the Corps of Engineers. Thirty-five percent is to be paid by local and state governments.

"If they continue to put this on hold, there won't be anything left of Terrebonne Parish to protect," Parish President Don Schwab said Tuesday. "Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes serve as a buffer to Jefferson and Orleans. We got to quit putting these things on hold. The president needs to bite the bullet."






But it's not just the administration that has raised questions about the levee project. Environmentalists for years have objected to building levees across south Louisiana's wetlands. Critics dubbed the project "The Great Wall of Louisiana." They said it would stop the natural flow of water through the coastal marshes and contribute to coastal erosion, a phenomenon that has made the entire region more vulnerable to hurricane storm surge.

Proponents of the massive levee building program have suggested so-called "leaky levees" that would permit the movement of tidal waters, but skeptics said the technology is unproven.

The nonprofit group Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana was among those opposing the plan on environmental grounds. Former coalition director Mark Davis, now a Tulane University professor, said he fears the Bush administration is seizing on environmental concerns to kill a project it doesn't want to pay for.

Davis said the administration hasn't raised similar objections to the Donaldsonville-to-the-Gulf levee project which, in his view, poses more substantial environmental hazards.

"If their concerns are technical, those can be worked out," Davis said. "If their concerns are budgetary, which concerns me most, then it's a more ominous signal that they aren't ready to commit to anything down here."
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109. Patrap
12:35 PM GMT on April 11, 2007
Once again folks,..when faced with Media censorship or censorship in General. Resist like your young were threatened. Because when it happens..they are.
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108. Patrap
12:34 PM GMT on April 11, 2007
The Weds is here Hump de day.
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107. Raysfan70
10:17 AM GMT on April 11, 2007
{{Pat and Family}}


Have a WUnderful Wednesday. :-)
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106. Lovethetropics
9:07 AM GMT on April 11, 2007

Good morning Patrap!! Wake up, it's super-ultra color coordinated Wednesday!!
Have a wonderful day filled with love and friendship!!


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105. AllyBama
5:00 AM GMT on April 11, 2007
Blog imagesBlog images
Happy Wednesday!
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104. Patrap
12:49 AM GMT on April 11, 2007
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103. Patrap
12:17 AM GMT on April 11, 2007
Im going fishing with Uncle Bill
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102. StormJunkie
11:05 PM GMT on April 10, 2007
Hey Gamma! good to see you!

Have a wonderful night!
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101. seflagamma
11:02 PM GMT on April 10, 2007
Hi Pat,

Thank you for stopping by my blog on Easter and leaving a post! Hope you and your family had a beautiful Easter Weekend.

Been reading all the information from the big Hurricane meeting in New Orleans a week or so ago. A lot of information coming out. Sure hope this year is not as bad as predicted!

You have a wonderful week and thanks again for stopping by!

Gams
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100. mermaidlaw
9:12 PM GMT on April 10, 2007

COOL MySpace Comments

Hi Pat, hope your having a great one!!

Rand will be round and round!!:)
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99. Patrap
9:06 PM GMT on April 10, 2007
.....Sure as the Dust Blows High in June,..when Moving thru Kashmirrrrrr!...5
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98. Patrap
12:21 PM GMT on April 10, 2007
Ohio Gozomez...Dozo!..Konichi wa!...Hi!
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97. Lovethetropics
12:18 PM GMT on April 10, 2007

Good morning Patrap!! Wake up, it's totally oriental Tuesday!!
Have a warm and beautiful day!!


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96. Patrap
11:55 AM GMT on April 10, 2007
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95. Raysfan70
10:01 AM GMT on April 10, 2007
{{Pat}}

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94. AllyBama
5:39 AM GMT on April 10, 2007
myspace layouts, myspace codes, glitter graphics
Good morning Pat!...may you have a most wonderful day..too bad that everyone isn't as sane as we are!..lol
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93. EmmyRose
3:34 AM GMT on April 10, 2007

Days of Week Images @ Bopmyspace.com
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92. Barefootontherocks
3:04 AM GMT on April 10, 2007
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91. Patrap
11:06 PM GMT on April 09, 2007


Area forecast discussion
National Weather Service New Orleans la
330 PM CDT Monday Apr 9 2007


Discussion...
warm air advection and isentropic lift should develop overnight and
into Tuesday as short wave trough over northern Mexico moves east across
the Gulf Coast region. The GFS has consistently been the most
aggressive in the development of precipitation with this system vs the NAM
guidance. While not confident of the GFS precipitation amounts...numerous
showers and mostly elevated thunderstorms activity should prevail across the
region with the best chances from late tonight into Tuesday middle
afternoon...before best forcing shift eastward. Some strong tstsms
possible especially in coastal areas as convection potentially
becomes more surface based as the warm air surges inland. Increased
the wording of the hazard weather outlook to highlight strong
thunderstorms and locally heavy rainfall. Could have a fairly decent
temperature gradient across the forecast area and Tuesday with highs on Tuesday
ranging from the low 60s from mcb in the rain north of the warm
front to lower 70s south of Houma
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90. Patrap
5:41 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
A government entity at the Federal Level dosent know left from right. Can that happen?..LOL!
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89. sandcrab39565
5:37 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Dont know left from right either.lol
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88. Patrap
5:36 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Big ol Hospital.. and no one has a Sharpie or Magic Marker?..LOL!
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87. sandcrab39565
5:33 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
LOL I dont blame yas after that mess up.
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86. Patrap
5:20 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Im never going back to the VA sandcrab..heres why..Link
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85. sandcrab39565
5:17 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Playing catch up lol a pile of paper on my desk.
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84. MisterPerfect
5:12 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Nice look at the French quarter..



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83. Patrap
4:19 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
NEIL YOUNG LYRICS

"It's A Dream"

In the morning when I wake up and listen to the sound
Of the birds outside on the roof
I try to ignore what the paper says
And I try not to read all the news
And I'll hold you if you had a bad dream
And I hope it never comes true
'Cause you and I been through so many things together
And the sun starts climbing the roof

It's a dream
Only a dream
And it's fading now
Fading away
It's only a dream
Just a memory without anywhere to stay

The Red River stills flows through my home town
Rollin' and tumblin' on its way
Swirling around the old bridge pylons
Where a boy fishes the morning away
His bicycle leans on an oak tree
While the cars rumble over his head
An aeroplane leaves a trail in an empty blue sky
And the young birds call out to be fed

It's a dream
Only a dream
And it's fading now
Fading away
It's only a dream
Just a memory without anywhere to stay

An old man walks along on the sidewalk
Sunglasses and an old Stetson hat
The four winds blow the back of his overcoat away
As he stops with the policeman to chat
And a train rolls out of the station
That was really somethin' in its day
Picking up speed on the straight prairie rails
As it carries the passengers away

It's gone
Only a dream
And it's fading now
Fading away
Only a dream
Just a memory without anywhere to stay

It's a dream
Only a dream
And it's fading now
Fading away
It's only a dream
Just a memory without anywhere to stay

It's a dream
Only a dream
And it's fading now
Fading away
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82. Patrap
3:43 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Everything isnt always what it appears to be..Link
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81. Patrap
3:40 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
..Confronted with censorship. Fight like a Lion possesed,..everytime...
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80. Patrap
2:53 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Dedicated to the one who knows..
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79. Patrap
12:48 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Easter Parade in New Orleans yesterday..A slideshow Link
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78. Patrap
12:43 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Morning "Latte Spill"...
Entergy to begin charging for fund
Fee provides reserve for future storms

Monday, April 09, 2007
By Pam Radtke Russell

Entergy New Orleans customers' bills will be a little bit longer and a little bit higher this month as the utility begins to build up a $75 million fund to pay for damages from future storms.

The "storm reserve rider," as listed on bills under both gas and electric service, will cost the average household $2.59 a month: $2.01 for electric service and 58 cents for gas service.

The charges were approved in October by the New Orleans City Council as part of a settlement with Entergy New Orleans, which asked to raise rates and to create a storm reserve fund. The settlement also calls for natural gas rates to increase this month by about 2 percent, or $3.75 a month for the average customer. In all, the agreement allows Entergy to raise electric and gas rates, including the storm reserve rider, by about 7.5 percent through April 2009.






Entergy New Orleans had insisted that it be allowed to collect money for a storm reserve fund, saying such a fund might be necessary for it to emerge from bankruptcy. Entergy New Orleans has been in bankruptcy since weeks after Hurricane Katrina but is still operating.

In part, the company went into bankruptcy because it did not have the cash flow to repair damage to its gas and electric systems. The reserve fund is expected to be sufficient to cover damage from future storms while averting any similar financial crisis.

"We know any bill increase, particularly in these difficult times, is unpopular. But we also know that after a storm, everyone wants their lights turned on as quickly as possible, and given the post-Katrina realities, this is the most responsible way to achieve that goal," said Morgan Stewart, a spokesman for Entergy New Orleans. "The storm reserve gives Entergy New Orleans the ability to restore the New Orleans electric and gas systems following future disasters, without burdening customers with the costs."

Entergy had originally requested that it be allowed to collect about $6 per month from every customer to create a $150 million fund. That request was deemed excessive by the City Council Utilities Committee and cut to $75 million.

The fee will be collected for 10 years. The City Council will review the collections in five years to make sure the fund amount is "appropriate," according to the agreement between the city and Entergy.

According to the agreement with the city, the money will be put in a separate "lock box" escrow fund that Entergy New Orleans will not be able to access unless it incurs at least $500,000 in storm costs.

As interest accumulates in the account, Councilwoman Shelley Midura said, it might become possible to reduce the amount collected.

Midura also said that such a fund, because it will provide assurances that Entergy New Orleans can better survive future storms, will allow the company to borrow money at lower rates, a savings that eventually could be passed on to customers.

Storm reserves were developed because standard insurance is not readily available on wires, poles and other portions of a utility's system that are most likely to be damaged in a hurricane. They aren't unique to New Orleans, nor are they unprecedented here.

Though it wasn't collected under a separate line item on customer bills, Entergy New Orleans had such a fund until it was wiped out by Hurricane Cindy in 2005.

As part of its agreement with the city, Entergy agreed to work with the city to urge that Congress amend the Stafford Act, which governs emergency federal spending. The amendment would allow the Federal Emergency Management Agency to cover the cost of utility damage in future storms.

If such a change were made, the storm reserve rider could become unnecessary, Midura said.
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77. Patrap
12:35 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Hey sandcrab..how goes it?
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76. Patrap
12:26 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Lennon..1980..A rare glimpse of John Lennon in 1980 perfoming one of the Double Fantasy songs on acoustic guitar.
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75. oakland
12:19 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Hopefully our last Holiday meal in this crackerbox Palace.

I hope it's your last holiday there too! I know it's been a roof over your head but it's time for better.
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74. Lovethetropics
12:17 PM GMT on April 09, 2007

Good morning Patrap!! Wake up, it's flipflop Monday!!
Have a warm and summery day!!


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73. sandcrab39565
12:17 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Link

Free site to make your preparedness plans
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72. Patrap
12:16 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Happy Birthday Hugh Hefner..MY Man! 81 today....Ahhhhh! Sweet Age..5
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71. Patrap
12:14 PM GMT on April 09, 2007
Here comes the Sun..
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70. Raysfan70
10:30 AM GMT on April 09, 2007
{{Pat and Family}}



Have a Great WUBAday! :-)
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68. taco2me61
2:46 AM GMT on April 09, 2007
LOL

I here ya... I could not sleep so I was up...

I was trying to catch the bunny in the act if you know what i mean....
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67. Patrap
2:43 AM GMT on April 09, 2007
Had sleet yesterday around 3-5pm cst. Then again after midnight. Not sure of the time as I was in bed. But the tinkling of sleet was kinda nice here in the ol FEMA home..LOL!
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66. Patrap
2:41 AM GMT on April 09, 2007
.8 .."Ill ketch ya Cat-5 fer yas!,,But itll cost ya plenty... !
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65. taco2me61
2:40 AM GMT on April 09, 2007
Pat
Just wondering about what time did the sleet go through... we had sleet about 1am and again at around 4am... I took pictures but they did not come out light enough to really see it... but I tried anyway...

Taco:0)

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
64. Patrap
2:39 AM GMT on April 09, 2007
That will be a good day fo sho..
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63. auburn (Mod)
2:33 AM GMT on April 09, 2007
One day I will meet you...and Rand..lol
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62. Patrap
2:33 AM GMT on April 09, 2007
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