Hurricane Preparation

By: Patrap , 2:11 PM GMT on March 23, 2009

Hurricane Preparation




Naval Safety Center

It's time to dust off that family disaster plan, or in many cases, create one.

Keeping your family safe during a hurricane starts with proper planning. One in six Americans live along the eastern seaboard or the Gulf of Mexico, making hurricane preparation a must for many and their families.








Evacuation Considerations for the Elderly, Disabled and Special Medical Care Issues

Your Evacuation Plan


Disaster Supplies Kit


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History teaches that a lack of hurricane awareness and preparation are common threads among all major hurricane disasters. By knowing your vulnerability and what actions you should take, you can reduce the effects of a hurricane disaster.

5
HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS TIPS



Hurricane hazards come in many forms: storm surge, high winds, tornadoes, and flooding. This means it is important for your family to have a plan that includes all of these hazards. Look carefully at the safety actions associated with each type of hurricane hazard and prepare your family disaster plan accordingly. But remember this is only a guide. The first and most important thing anyone should do when facing a hurricane threat is to use common sense.

You should be able to answer the following questions before a hurricane threatens:

*
What are the Hurricane Hazards?
*
What does it mean to you?
*
What actions should you take to be prepared?

Hurricanes and Your Health and Safety


* The great majority of injuries during a hurricane are cuts caused by flying glass or other debris. Other injuries include puncture wounds resulting from exposed nails, metal, or glass, and bone fractures.
* State and local health departments may issue health advisories or recommendations particular to local conditions. If in doubt, contact your local or state health department.
* Make sure to include all essential medications -- both prescription and over the counter -- in your family's emergency disaster kit.


* Hurricanes, especially if accompanied by a tidal surge or flooding, can contaminate the public water supply. Drinking contaminated water may cause illness. You cannot assume that the water in the hurricane-affected area is safe to drink.
* In the area hit by a hurricane, water treatment plants may not be operating; even if they are, storm damage and flooding can contaminate water lines. Listen for public announcements about the safety of the municipal water supply.
* If your well has been flooded, it needs to be tested and disinfected after the storm passes and the floodwaters recede. Questions about testing should be directed to your local or state health department.

Water Safety

* Use bottled water that has not been exposed to flood waters if it is available.
* If you don't have bottled water, you should boil water to make it safe. Boiling water will kill most types of disease-causing organisms that may be present. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for boiling. Boil the water for one minute, let it cool, and store it in clean containers with covers.
* If you can't boil water, you can disinfect it using household bleach. Bleach will kill some, but not all, types of disease-causing organisms that may be in the water. If the water is cloudy, filter it through clean cloths or allow it to settle, and draw off the clear water for disinfection. Add 1/8 teaspoon (or 8 drops) of regular, unscented, liquid household bleach for each gallon of water, stir it well and let it stand for 30 minutes before you use it. Store disinfected water in clean containers with covers.
* If you have a well that has been flooded, the water should be tested and disinfected after flood waters recede. If you suspect that your well may be contaminated, contact your local or state health department or agriculture extension agent for specific advice.

Food Safety

* Do not eat any food that may have come into contact with flood water.
* Discard any food that is not in a waterproof container if there is any chance that it has come into contact with flood water. Food containers that are not waterproof include those with screw-caps, snap lids, pull tops, and crimped caps. Also, discard cardboard juice/milk/baby formula boxes and home canned foods if they have come in contact with flood water, because they cannot be effectively cleaned and sanitized.
* Inspect canned foods and discard any food in damaged cans. Can damage is shown by swelling; leakage; punctures; holes; fractures; extensive deep rusting; or crushing/denting severe enough to prevent normal stacking or opening with a manual, wheel-type can opener.
* Undamaged, commercially prepared foods in all-metal cans and retort pouches (for example, flexible, shelf-stable juice or seafood pouches) can be saved if you do the following:
o Remove the labels, if they are the removable kind, since they can harbor dirt and bacteria.
o Thoroughly wash the cans or retort pouches with soap and water, using hot water if it is available.
o Brush or wipe away any dirt or silt.
o Rinse the cans or retort pouches with water that is safe for drinking, if available, since dirt or residual soap will reduce the effectiveness of chlorine sanitation.
o Then, sanitize them by immersion in one of the two following ways:
+ place in water and allow the water to come to a boil and continue boiling for 2 minutes, or
+ place in a freshly-made solution consisting of 1 tablespoon of unscented liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available) for 15 minutes.
* Air dry cans or retort pouches for a minimum of 1 hour before opening or storing.
* If the labels were removable, then re-label your cans or retort pouches, including the expiration date (if available), with a marker.
* Food in reconditioned cans or retort pouches should be used as soon as possible, thereafter.
* Any concentrated baby formula in reconditioned, all-metal containers must be diluted with clean, drinking water.
* Thoroughly wash metal pans, ceramic dishes, and utensils (including can openers) with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize them by boiling in clean water or immersing them for 15 minutes in a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available).
* Thoroughly wash countertops with soap and water, using hot water if available. Rinse, and then sanitize by applying a solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water (or the cleanest, clearest water available). Allow to air dry.

Frozen and Refrigerated Foods

* If you will be without power for a long period:
o ask friends to store your frozen foods in their freezers if they have electricity;
o see if freezer space is available in a store, church, school, or commercial freezer that has electrical service; or
o use dry ice, if available. Twenty-five pounds of dry ice will keep a ten-cubic-foot freezer below freezing for 3-4 days. Use care when handling dry ice, and wear dry, heavy gloves to avoid injury.
* Your refrigerator will keep foods cool for about four hours without power if it is unopened. Add block or dry ice to your refrigerator if the electricity will be off longer than four hours.
* Thawed food can usually be eaten if it is still "refrigerator cold," or re-frozen if it still contains ice crystals.
* To be safe, remember, "When in doubt, throw it out." Discard any food that has been at room temperature for two hours or more, and any food that has an unusual odor, color, or texture.

Sanitation and Hygiene

It is critical for you to remember to practice basic hygiene during the emergency period. Always wash your hands with soap and water that has been boiled or disinfected:

* before preparing or eating
* after toilet use
* after participating in cleanup activities; and
* after handling articles contaminated with floodwater or sewage.

If there is flooding along with a hurricane, the waters may contain fecal material from overflowing sewage systems and agricultural and industrial waste. Although skin contact with floodwater does not, by itself, pose a serious health risk, there is risk of disease from eating or drinking anything contaminated with floodwater.

If you have any open cuts or sores that will be exposed to floodwater, keep them as clean as possible by washing them with soap and applying an antibiotic ointment to discourage infection. If a wound develops redness, swelling, or drainage, seek immediate medical attention.

Do not allow children to play in floodwater areas. Wash children's hands frequently (always before meals), and do not allow children to play with floodwater-contaminated toys that have not been disinfected. You can disinfect toys using a solution of one cup of bleach in five gallons of water.

Immunizations

Outbreaks of communicable diseases after hurricanes are unusual. However, the rates of diseases that were present before a hurricane may increase because of a lack of sanitation or overcrowding in shelters. Increases in infectious diseases that were not present before the hurricane are not a problem, so mass vaccination programs are unnecessary.

If you have wounds, you should be evaluated for a tetanus immunization, just as you would at any other time of injury. If you receive a puncture wound or a wound contaminated with feces, soil, or saliva, have a doctor or health department determine whether a tetanus booster is necessary based on individual records.

Specific recommendations for vaccinations should be made on a case-by-case basis, or as determined by local and state health departments.

Mosquitoes

Rain and flooding in a hurricane area may lead to an increase in mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are most active at sunrise and sunset. In most cases, the mosquitoes will be pests but will not carry communicable diseases. It is unlikely that diseases which were not present in the area prior to the hurricane would be of concern. Local, state, and federal public health authorities will be actively working to control the spread of any mosquito-borne diseases.

To protect yourself from mosquitoes, use screens on dwellings, and wear clothes with long sleeves and long pants. Insect repellents that contain DEET are very effective. Be sure to read all instructions before using DEET. Care must be taken when using DEET on small children. Products containing DEET are available from stores and through local and state health departments.

To control mosquito populations, drain all standing water left in open containers outside your home.

Mental Health

The days and weeks after a hurricane are going to be rough. In addition to your physical health, you need to take some time to consider your mental health as well. Remember that some sleeplessness, anxiety, anger, hyperactivity, mild depression, or lethargy are normal, and may go away with time. If you feel any of these symptoms acutely, seek counseling. Remember that children need extra care and attention before, during, and after the storm. Be sure to locate a favorite toy or game for your child before the storm arrives to help maintain his/her sense of security. Your state and local health departments will help you find the local resources, including hospitals or health care providers, that you may need.

Seeking Assistance after a Hurricane

SEEKING DISASTER ASSISTANCE: Throughout the recovery period, it is important to monitor local radio or television reports and other media sources for information about where to get emergency housing, food, first aid, clothing, and financial assistance. The following section provides general information about the kinds of assistance that may be available.

DIRECT ASSISTANCE: Direct assistance to individuals and families may come from any number of organizations, including: the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army, and other volunteer organizations. These organizations provide food, shelter, supplies and assist in clean-up efforts.

THE FEDERAL ROLE: In the most severe disasters, the federal government is also called in to help individuals and families with temporary housing, counseling (for post-disaster trauma), low-interest loans and grants, and other assistance. The federal government also has programs that help small businesses and farmers.

Most federal assistance becomes available when the President of the United States declares a �Major Disaster� for the affected area at the request of a state governor. FEMA will provide information through the media and community outreach about federal assistance and how to apply.

Coping after a Hurricane Everyone who sees or experiences a hurricane is affected by it in some way. It is normal to feel anxious about your own safety and that of your family and close friends. Profound sadness, grief, and anger are normal reactions to an abnormal event. Acknowledging your feelings helps you recover. Focusing on your strengths and abilities helps you heal. Accepting help from community programs and resources is healthy. Everyone has different needs and different ways of coping. It is common to want to strike back at people who have caused great pain. Children and older adults are of special concern in the aftermath of disasters. Even individuals who experience a disaster �second hand� through exposure to extensive media coverage can be affected.

Contact local faith-based organizations, voluntary agencies, or professional counselors for counseling. Additionally, FEMA and state and local governments of the affected area may provide crisis counseling assistance.

Minimize this emotional and traumatic experience by being prepared, not scared and therefore you and your family will stay in control and survive a major hurricane.

SIGNS OF HURRICANE RELATED STRESS:

* Difficulty communicating thoughts.
* Difficulty sleeping.
* Difficulty maintaining balance in their lives.
* Low threshold of frustration.
* Increased use of drugs/alcohol.
* Limited attention span.
* Poor work performance.
* Headaches/stomach problems.
* Tunnel vision/muffled hearing.
* Colds or flu-like symptoms.
* Disorientation or confusion.
* Difficulty concentrating.
* Reluctance to leave home.
* Depression, sadness.
* Feelings of hopelessness.
* Mood-swings and easy bouts of crying.
* Overwhelming guilt and self-doubt.
* Fear of crowds, strangers, or being alone.

EASING HURRICANE RELATED STRESS:

* Talk with someone about your feelings - anger, sorrow, and other emotions - even though it may be difficult.
* Seek help from professional counselors who deal with post-disaster stress.
* Do not hold yourself responsible for the disastrous event or be frustrated because you feel you cannot help directly in the rescue work.
* Take steps to promote your own physical and emotional healing by healthy eating, rest, exercise, relaxation, and meditation.
* Maintain a normal family and daily routine, limiting demanding responsibilities on yourself and your family.
* Spend time with family and friends.
* Participate in memorials.
* Use existing support groups of family, friends, and religious institutions.
* Ensure you are ready for future events by restocking your disaster supplies kits and updating your family disaster plans.

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The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

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52. Patrap
4:17 AM GMT on March 28, 2009
good stuff there mp.

gonna power down with this weather.,...

Take care ,Sunshine returns tomorrow,


Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
51. MisterPerfect
4:15 AM GMT on March 28, 2009


Hope you doing well Solider.
Don't know ya beyond cyber land...but yer a good customer.

Hope the wife and kids are happier than yourself...its your job anyhow..

Hang in there Pat.

And if ever I do I'll be NOLA for day or 365...



Help us all.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
50. Patrap
2:05 AM GMT on March 28, 2009
Thanks sandcrab..

Radar Looks like a Xmas Tree on steroids again.

Take care and keep dry..

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
49. sandcrab39565
2:03 AM GMT on March 28, 2009
Got a good boomer going on right now. Lots of rain to. The creeks are all full so some flooding is eminent. Take care stay on the high ground.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
47. Patrap
1:01 AM GMT on March 28, 2009
Tornado Watch Box # 83 Valid to 2am CST
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46. Patrap
12:15 AM GMT on March 28, 2009
Radio Shack WR-100 is a Good un MissNadia
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45. MissNadia
11:53 PM GMT on March 27, 2009
44
I have a Radio Shack and it works good.
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44. Patrap
11:51 PM GMT on March 27, 2009
Dont be left in the Dark about Warnings....

NOAA Alert Weather Radio's




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43. Patrap
11:39 PM GMT on March 27, 2009
Where's the Deflector screens when ya could use um..?


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42. Patrap
11:32 PM GMT on March 27, 2009
I tell yas..itsa trouble a coming and occurring now.




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41. Patrap
11:24 PM GMT on March 27, 2009
Well..after last night and bout 2 hours rest this afternoon. Mostly soggy.
But showa brought a lil life back into the bones.


Geez,another round tonight.

Twas 2 feet of water on the street here at 2am. Barely got the Saturn and Neighbors cars to Walgreens and high ground. Thank goodness for dat Black truck.

Howd ya'll make out?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
40. tkeith
11:18 PM GMT on March 27, 2009
how ya feelin Pat?
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39. Patrap
11:17 PM GMT on March 27, 2009


NOLA RiverCAM
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38. Patrap
11:07 PM GMT on March 27, 2009
TVS Signature's in 2 States.

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37. Patrap
10:24 PM GMT on March 27, 2009


NEXRAD Radar
Fort Polk, Composite Reflectivity Range 124 NMI
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36. Patrap
10:21 PM GMT on March 27, 2009
Storms around 1 am CST this morning,Uptown NOLA.

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35. Patrap
10:15 PM GMT on March 27, 2009
www.nola.com/rivercam/
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34. Patrap
6:21 PM GMT on March 27, 2009
Dixie got nuff ..

Hunker down if need be.

Prayers.
Hope.






The True Story of The Patton Prayer
by Msgr. James H. O'Neill


As the Chief Chaplain of the Third Army throughout the five campaigns on the Staff of General Patton, I should have some knowledge of the event because at the direction of General Patton I composed the now world famous Prayer, and wrote Training Letter No. 5, which constitutes an integral, but untold part, of the prayer story. These Incidents, narrated in sequence, should serve to enhance the memory of the man himself, and cause him to be enshrined by generations to come as one of the greatest of our soldiers. He had all the traits of military leadership, fortified by genuine trust in God, intense love of country, and high faith In the American soldier.

He had no use for half-measures. He wrote this line a few days before his death: "Anyone in any walk of life who is content with mediocrity is untrue to himself and to American tradition." He was true to the principles of his religion, Episcopalian, and was regular in Church attendance and practices, unless duty made his presence Impossible.

The incident of the now famous Patton Prayer commenced with a telephone call to the Third Army Chaplain on the morning of December 8, 1944, when the Third Army Headquarters were located in the Caserne Molifor in Nancy, France: "This is General Patton; do you have a good prayer for weather? We must do something about those rains if we are to win the war." My reply was that I know where to look for such a prayer, that I would locate, and report within the hour. As I hung up the telephone receiver, about eleven in the morning, I looked out on the steadily falling rain, "immoderate" I would call it -- the same rain that had plagued Patton's Army throughout the Moselle and Saar Campaigns from September until now, December 8. The few prayer books at hand contained no formal prayer on weather that might prove acceptable to the Army Commander. Keeping his immediate objective in mind, I typed an original and an improved copy on a 5" x 3" filing card:

Almighty and most merciful Father, we humbly beseech Thee, of Thy great goodness, to restrain these immoderate rains with which we have had to contend. Grant us fair weather for Battle. Graciously hearken to us as soldiers who call upon Thee that, armed with Thy power, we may advance from victory to victory, and crush the oppression and wickedness of our enemies and establish Thy justice among men and nations.
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33. Patrap
7:12 AM GMT on March 27, 2009
Widespread street flooding occurring Uptown New Orleans. Had to move my Saturn and Neighbors sedan out the hood to Walgreen's Lot near the River.
Been raining and rumbling for hours now. Lotsa reports of Water,Hail and some tornado Warnings too. Rough night for sure.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
32. 0084PenguinLover
5:04 AM GMT on March 27, 2009
Pat:

In reference to the March 26th launch. One of the Americans on that mission. I cannot recall his last name, but his first name is Michael. He is from the town just 5 miles from me. Tonight on the local news they showed his cousins, second cousins and Aunts & Uncles as they gathered to watch his launch.

It was pretty cool to listen to one of his second cousins (Probably between 11 & 14- I am a poor judge) said that he'd been reading up on space travel and thinks that, "I might want to continue looking into space travel for myself."

It's not every day that we get that kind of distinction in the PacNW.

Once again I enjoyed your Preparedness Tips this year. I don't travel much, and in the PacNW our biggest fear is either a big quake or volcano going insane, but I am sure that much of what you post for hurricanes would also help in many other disasters.

Thanks and Peace, PL
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31. EmmyRose
6:47 PM GMT on March 26, 2009
BULLETIN - EAS ACTIVATION REQUESTED SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE NEW ORLEANS LA 140 PM CDT THU MAR 26 2009 THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN NEW ORLEANS HAS ISSUED A * SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNING FOR... NORTHWESTERN TANGIPAHOA PARISH IN SOUTHEAST LOUISIANA... SOUTHERN PIKE COUNTY IN SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI... * UNTIL 245 PM CDT * AT 137 PM CDT...NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE DOPPLER RADAR INDICATED A SEVERE THUNDERSTORM CAPABLE OF PRODUCING NICKEL SIZE HAIL. THIS STORM WAS LOCATED NEAR OSYKA...OR 16 MILES NORTHEAST OF GREENSBURG...AND MOVING NORTHEAST AT 20 MPH. * THE SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WILL BE NEAR... RURAL PIKE COUNTY AT 150 PM CDT RURAL TANGIPAHOA PARISH AT 150 PM CDT THIS IS A DANGEROUS STORM. IF YOU ARE IN ITS PATH...PREPARE IMMEDIATELY FOR DAMAGING WINDS...DESTRUCTIVE HAIL...AND DEADLY CLOUD TO GROUND LIGHTNING. PEOPLE OUTSIDE SHOULD MOVE TO A SHELTER... PREFERABLY INSIDE A STRONG BUILDING BUT AWAY FROM WINDOWS. LAT...LON 3120 9026 3101 9026 3101 9034 3092 9035 3086 9052 3094 9057 3100 9056 3100 9054 3105 9054 TIME...MOT...LOC 1840Z 241DEG 19KT 3099 9045
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30. Patrap
3:22 PM GMT on March 26, 2009
Page and Plant


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29. Patrap
3:17 PM GMT on March 26, 2009
Blogman..

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28. Patrap
3:10 PM GMT on March 26, 2009
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25. Patrap
2:51 PM GMT on March 26, 2009
The Cardigans Lyrics


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24. Patrap
2:46 PM GMT on March 26, 2009
Je vais paraître vieux jeu, mais je suis un peu nostalgique de la période Emmerdale, et de son esprit pop mélodique qu'on ne retrouve pas vraiment dans cette chanson plus récente des Cardigans.

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23. Patrap
2:22 PM GMT on March 26, 2009
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22. Patrap
2:21 PM GMT on March 26, 2009
Catholic Charities' Operation Helping Hands Celebrates Katrina Milestones: 20,000 Volunteers and 2,500 Projects


NEW ORLEANS, March 25, 2009 /PRNewswire-USNewswire via COMTEX/ ----

On Thursday, March 26 at 3 p.m. CDT, Catholic Charities' Operation Helping Hands will celebrate huge milestones reached in the ongoing Katrina recovery of New Orleans: 20,000 volunteers from all over the globe and 2,500 gutting and rebuilding projects.

The celebration will be at Operation Helping Hands' staging area, located in the closed St. Raymond's Church at 3728 Paris Avenue. About 150 volunteers will be on hand, as well as homeowners who have benefited from the program, community partners, and staff. Local businesses have donated food, music and other entertainment as part of the celebration.
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21. Patrap
2:16 PM GMT on March 26, 2009
MBA candidates test skills in New Orleans

Updated 3/25/2009 6:35 Pm

By Rick Jervis, USA TODAY

NEW ORLEANS — Just a year ago, students at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business would be elbowing for an internship at a Wall Street investment firm.

Instead, this week eight of them are spending Spring Break in New Orleans helping a local entrepreneur develop a business strategy for selling his eco-friendly flip-flops.

Wall Street's troubles have master's degree candidates rethinking life after graduation, said Matt Nash of the Center for the Advancement of Social Entrepreneurship at Duke University.
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20. Patrap
2:10 PM GMT on March 26, 2009


New Orleans reflection
by Kelicia Hollis


It seemed too good to be true. When I first saw the announcement in the fall for the alternative spring break trip to New Orleans with the Office of Multicultural Affairs and Hillel, my immediate reaction was that I always wanted to commit to a trip like this. As a writer, I also thought it was a great chance to bring a community that I felt had been forgotten back into the forefront of people’s minds.

From December on, our Mondays were dedicated to talking about the social justice aspect of the trip. Our own identities seemed to be the focus of our discussions, and initially I struggled with how little our conversations had to do with rebuilding New Orleans. Yet over 30 of us gathered each Monday evening and opened up to each other with various activities and exercises. Once the trip grew nearer we began to talk about New Orleans more explicitly, and my skepticism abated—our conversations finally met the expectations that I had come in with.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
19. Patrap
2:07 PM GMT on March 26, 2009
LA food folks: Gisele Perez, a California caterer with New Orleans roots


Gisele Perez, owner and chef of small pleasures catering, worked in restaurants and hotels for more than 20 years before going to culinary school and starting her own business. She talks about her New Orleans roots, what to do with candied violets, and sign language in the kitchen.

Gisele's clients love her ancho chile grilled shrimp with chile rosemary aioli. Thanks for sharing the recipe, Gisele!
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17. Patrap
2:02 PM GMT on March 26, 2009


Batt on a Hot Tin Roof to Benefit New Orleans Theater

By Andrew Gans
26 Mar 2009

Broadway actor and "Mad Men" star Bryan Batt will offer a performance of his one-man show to benefit the New Orleans theatre Le Petit Théâtre duVieux Carré.

Entitled Batt on a Hot Tin Roof, the April 11 fundraiser will be held at that Louisiana venue. Show time is 7 PM.

In a statement Batt said, "Le Petit Theatre introduced me to my love of the theatre. I will do whatever is in my power to save this 93-year-old landmark that sits on the corner of Jackson Square."
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16. Patrap
2:00 PM GMT on March 26, 2009
RiverCAM
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15. Patrap
10:44 PM GMT on March 25, 2009
Flash Flood Watch, Coastal Flood Statement

Statement as of 3:51 PM CDT on March 25, 2009

... Flash Flood Watch in effect through Saturday morning...

The National Weather Service in New Orleans has issued a

* Flash Flood Watch for portions of southeast Louisiana and
southern Mississippi... including the following areas... in
southeast Louisiana... Ascension... Assumption... East Baton
Rouge... East Feliciana... Iberville... Livingston... lower
Jefferson... lower Lafourche... lower Plaquemines... lower St.
Bernard... lower Terrebonne... Orleans... Pointe Coupee... St.
Charles... St. Helena... St. James... St. John The Baptist... St.
Tammany... Tangipahoa... upper Jefferson... upper Lafourche...
upper Plaquemines... upper St. Bernard... upper Terrebonne...
Washington... West Baton Rouge and West Feliciana. In southern
Mississippi... Amite... Hancock... Harrison... Jackson... Pearl
River... Pike... Walthall and Wilkinson.

* Through Saturday morning

* several rounds of thunderstorms are expected tonight through
Friday night. Each round of thunderstorms will be capable of
producing one to three inches of rain. With a stationary front
in place... several thunderstorms may move over an area in a few
hours. While the last few weeks have been rather dry... this
amount of rain will certainly be capable of producing flooding.

Precautionary/preparedness actions...

A Flash Flood Watch means that conditions may develop that lead
to flash flooding. Flash flooding is a very dangerous situation.

You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action
should flash flood warnings be issued.


343 PM CDT Wed Mar 25 2009

... Higher than normal tides will continue through Friday evening...

Another surface low is expected to deepen over the Southern Plains
late tonight through Thursday. This low will track east and drag a
cold front into the area Friday. As a result... strong south to
southeast winds of 15 to 30 mph will persist over the coastal
sections. Astronomical high tide is expected Thursday morning
and Friday late morning. Both features will result in tide levels
around 1 to 2 feet above normal high tide Thursday morning and 2
feet above normal high tide Friday morning. A coastal Flood Watch
may be required Friday morning.

All persons in the coastal area should pay close attention to the
tide levels... be prepared to take immediate action to protect life
and property... and should be ready to move to higher ground.
Remain alert and keep listening to your radio... television... or
NOAA Weather Radio for updates... watches or warnings.
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14. Patrap
1:20 PM GMT on March 24, 2009
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13. Patrap
1:06 PM GMT on March 24, 2009
Page and Plant,Wonderful One


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12. Patrap
5:19 PM GMT on March 23, 2009
A special Thanks and Hugs for Blogger IMA and her Husband for coming to NOLA and sharing some time and helping Portlight in its inaugural Relief Walk of 2009. Shes one tough Gal and a True Inspiration to us all.

A Big Easy Salute to you and Yours and a safe Journey Home..



Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
11. Patrap
5:04 PM GMT on March 23, 2009
Generators are a must in Hurricane Prone areas..and for any Emergency that one loses power from.

Its a good investment.

Honda Generators





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10. EmmyRose
3:52 PM GMT on March 23, 2009
Damn this diet is killing me
and then I see beignet

I SEE SUGARDONUTS.........
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9. Patrap
3:48 PM GMT on March 23, 2009




Expedition 19
Launch Vehicle:
Soyuz TMA-14

Launch:
March 26, 2009
7:49 a.m. EDT

Docking:
March 28, 2009
9:14 a.m. EDT

Landing:
Oct. 11, 2009




They just can't keep this guy away from outer space
By Bruce Sterling March 22, 2009 | 1:47:07 PM



SPACE ADVENTURES’ ORBITAL SPACEFLIGHT CLIENT CHARLES SIMONYI OUTLINES MISSION ACTIVITIES AS HE READIES FOR LAUNCH TO THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION

Simonyi Makes History as the First Repeat Private Space Explorer

In preparation for his March 26 launch, Charles Simonyi has outlined the mission objectives he hopes to achieve during his second visit to the International Space Station (ISS). Dr. Simonyi is the seventh orbital client for Space Adventures, Ltd., the only company that provides human space missions to the world marketplace.

Dr. Simonyi will make history during his spaceflight by becoming the first private explorer to complete a second mission to space. He previously flew to the ISS in spring 2007 as Space Adventures’ fifth orbital client. On his return mission, Dr. Simonyi aims to continue to make contributions toward space research, and advance civilian space travel while inspiring kids in their studies of science and math. ((("Won't somebody think of the children." I'd be guessing that giving kids tours of science labs would be cheaper and easier than firing a Microsoftie into orbit repeatedly, but who knows.)))
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8. Patrap
3:40 PM GMT on March 23, 2009


Quoting oreodogsghost:
Fighting the howlers of intolerance, one crazy at a time.



Somebody's gotta do it Odog..



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7. Patrap
3:35 PM GMT on March 23, 2009
Does Ironman have a twitter feed?

LOL

Morning Emmy..

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6. Patrap
3:34 PM GMT on March 23, 2009


7560.49 +282.11‎ (3.88%‎) Mar 23 11:32am ET
Open: 7279.25
High: 7583.75
Low: 7257.83

Volume: 161,828,949
Avg Vol: 449,952,000
Mkt Cap: N/A
Disclaimer




Looks Like a fine day all around..
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5. EmmyRose
3:33 PM GMT on March 23, 2009
LOL that could be a bumper stick Odog

Morning pat and t
hope all is well in your neck of the woods.
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4. oreodogsghost
3:30 PM GMT on March 23, 2009
Fighting the howlers of intolerance, one crazy at a time.
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3. Patrap
3:14 PM GMT on March 23, 2009
G'morning odog..



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2. oreodogsghost
2:29 PM GMT on March 23, 2009
Thanks for putting the list up again.
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