Record-Strength Upper Low Brings Extreme Rains to South U.S., Thundersnow to Mexico

By: Bob Henson and Jeff Masters , 4:51 PM GMT on March 10, 2016

A remarkably rare atmospheric event is unfolding over Mexico and the Southern U.S., where an upper-level low pressure system of unprecedented strength in the historical record for that location has stalled out, bringing multiple days of torrential rain to the Southern U.S. and snow to the mountains of Mexico. The upper low tapped into an atmospheric river of moisture from both the Western Caribbean and the Eastern Pacific, bringing rainfall amounts one would expect to occur only once every 200 years (a 0.5% chance of occurrence in a given year) over portions of northern Louisiana. According to the latest NOAA Storm Summary, as of 9 am EST Thursday, the city of Monroe, Louisiana had received 17.25" of rain since Monday, and Shreveport had picked up 16.70" at Barksdale Air Force Base. The heavy rains led to numerous high water rescues, evacuation of at least 3,500 homes, and closures of hundreds of roads. Portions of two interstate highways in northern Louisiana--I-20 and I-49--were closed on Thursday morning due to flooding, according to KSLA.com. Three drownings have been reported since Monday from the storm system--one each in Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana.


Figure 1. Flood damage in Haughton, Louisiana, on March 9, 2016. Thirty homes near Haughton were inundated by flood waters on Tuesday night, forcing evacuations. Image credit: Michael Dean Newman.


Figure 2. A webcam from Zacatecas, Mexico, catches snow falling on Wednesday, March 9, 2016. Thundersnow was reported at the city’s official reporting site. Image credit: webcamsdemexico.com, courtesy Eric Blake.


Figure 3. Observed 48-hour precipitation for the period ending at 10 am EST Thursday, March 10, 2016. Portions of northern Louisiana received over 16" of rain, and a large area of 8+" fell over portions of Eastern Texas, Northern Louisiana, Southeast Arkansas and Northwest Mississippi. Image credit: NOAA/NWS.


Figure 4. Average recurrence interval in years for the 24-hour rainfall amounts that fell ending at 7 am EST Wednesday, March 9, 2016. Rainfall amounts one would expect to occur only once every 200 years (a 0.5% chance of occurrence in a given year) fell over some portions of northern Louisiana just east of Shreveport. MetStat computed the recurrence interval statistics based on gauge-adjusted radar precipitation and frequency estimates from NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 8, published in 2013 (http://dipper.nws.noaa.gov/hdsc/pfds/.) The real-time analysis (observed) can be monitored for free at: http://metstat.com/solutions/extreme-precipitation-index-analysis/ or on their Facebook page.  MetStat also offers a subscription for precipitation interval forecasts and analyses at http://metstat.com/solutions/extreme-precipitation-index-forecasts/


Figure 5. The Bayou Dorcheat at Lake Bistineau, Louisiana reached its highest water level on record Thursday morning. The extreme rains in northern Louisiana have poured into local lakes and rivers, sending a few close to or in excess of their highest water levels on record. On Friday, the Sabine River near Burkeville is predicted to exceed its highest crest since 1884. Image credit: NOAA.

Weather weirding par excellence: Strongest upper low ever observed over central Mexico?
This upper low originated from energy that moved across southern California late in the weekend, producing heavy thunderstorms. Rather than barreling across the southeast U.S., the powerful subtropical jet stream carved out a progressively deeper trough into Mexico that cut off from the jet stream, forming a slow-moving closed low. At 00Z (7:00 pm EST) Thursday, this cold-cored upper low was centered in central Mexico, roughly in the vicinity of Guadalajara. Thundersnow was reported on Wednesday in Mexico at Zacatecas (altitude 8010 feet), about 200 miles north of Guadalajara. However, weather records researcher Maximiliano Herrera told us in an email that snow in the mountains of northern Mexico has occurred in April, May and even early June, so is not that unusual. As shown in Figure 7 below, this upper low featured a large 558-decameter contour (the 558 dm, which is 5580 meters, refers to the height at which the atmospheric pressure is 500 mb, or about half of the typical surface pressure). Such a large, strong upper low appears to be an unprecedented event in modern weather observations for Mexico; upper-air analyses dating back to 1948 from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis project suggest that no previous upper low in this region has been strong enough to generate a 558-dm contour. During the last “super” El Niño, in mid-December 1997, a powerful upper trough extended south from the United States, producing what was reportedly the first snow observed at Guadalajara since February 1881. Low-level temperatures have not been quite as cold this time around, given that it’s now early March rather than mid-December, but the thundersnow reported at Zacatecas indicates the strong instability being produced by the deep cold at upper levels. The gradient between this upper low and a strong upper ridge over the eastern U.S. has also intensified the southerly flow pumping moisture into the south-central states.


Figure 6. GOES satellite imagery from 0245Z Thursday, March 10, 2016 (9:30 pm EST Wednesday), shows the immense swirl of an upper-level low centered over central Mexico, as well as the stream of moisture extending from the waters of the eastern tropical Pacific (still warmed by El Niño) across the western Gulf of Mexico into Texas and Louisiana. Image credit: NASA Earth Science Office and NOAA.


Figure 7. 500-mb map for 00Z (7:00 pm EST) Thursday, March 10, 2016, as initialized in the GFS model. Image credit: NOAA/NCEP.


Figure 8. 500-mb map for 12Z (7:00 am EST) Friday, December 12, 1997, about the time that the upper trough had reached its maximum extent into Mexico. Image credit: NOAA Daily Weather Map.

Premature spring warmth swaddles Northeast
Dozens of temperature records melted like so much gelato beneath sun-filled skies across much of the Northeast on Wednesday. Boston basked in temperatures that topped out at 77°F--not just a daily record, but the city’s warmest official reading on any day in astronomical winter since records began there in 1872. New York City’s Central Park also had its earliest 77°F in records that, likewise, go back to 1872. The uncannily mild air served as a fitting curtain call after New England’s warmest meteorological winter on record (Dec-Feb). The lack of persistent snow cover across New York and New England helped give this week’s warmth an extra boost. Some of the records set on Wednesday, March 9, 2016 included:

Earliest 80°F on record
Albany, NY:  81°F (previous record March 16, 1990)
Hartford, CT: 81°F (previous record March 20, 1945)
Newark, NJ: 82°F (previous record March 13, 1990)Poughkeepsie, NY: 82°F (previous record March 13, 1990)

Earliest 75°F on record
Boston, MA: 77°F (previous record March 14, 1946)
Concord, NH: 77°F (previous record March 18, 2012)

Earliest 70°F on record
Glens Falls, NY 77°F (previous record March 13, 1990)

Earliest 65°F on record
Montpelier, VT: 66°F (previous record March 15, 1990)
St. Johnsbury, VT: 65°F (previous record March 16, 1990)


Figure 9. Spring fever sweeps across the campus of Columbia University in New York City on Wednesday, March 9. Image credit: Bob Henson.

The forecast: more flooding in the South, more warmth for the East
Looking ahead, the atmospheric river of moisture responsible for this week's heavy rains has shifted slightly eastwards, and was still at near-record levels in excess of 200% of normal on Thursday morning. The 12Z Thursday morning balloon sounding at Lake Charles, Louisiana showed an astonishing 2.15" of precipitable water in the atmosphere--the second highest value on record for the months of December - April (thanks go to Peter Mullinax, ‏@wxmvpete, for this stat.) This moisture will continue to feed torrential rains over Louisiana, Arkansas and Mississippi on Thursday and Friday.


Figure 10. Predicted precipitation for the 3-day period ending 7 am EST Sunday, March 13, 2016. Heavy rains in excess of 7" (brown colors) are expected over eastern Louisiana, including New Orleans. Image credit: National Weather Service.

A solid week of unusually mild air lies in store for most of the nation east of the Rockies. Though we can expect dozens if not hundreds of daily record highs to be set between now and then, it looks highly unlikely this mild spell will dislodge the Great Warm Wave of March 2012 from its place of pride in our late-winter/early-spring climate annals. That phenomenal stretch of warmth brought close to a week of temperatures topping 80°F from the Midwest to the Northeast. The town of Lapeer, Michigan, hit 90°F on March 21 (setting a state record for March). Readings that would have broken records for April, much less March, extended into the Canadian Maritimes.



Video 1. Drone footage of flooding in Bossier City in Northern Louisiana on March 9, 2016. Thanks go to wunderground member Skyepony for posting this video in the blog comments.

Bob Henson and Jeff Masters

Wallace Lake Road Shreveport Louisiana (blee009)
Wallace Lake Road Shreveport Louisiana
Wallace Lake Road Shreveport Louisiana

The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 188 - 138

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4Blog Index

188. MahFL
4:40 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 185. Seattleite:



If most Americans began to pay attention to the onslaught of "epic" weather events they *might* be forced to conclude that AGW is real ...


Most Americans do believe in Global Warming:

"Polls show most Americans believe in climate change, but give it low priority"

http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/09/23/m ost-americans-believe-in-climate-change-but-give-i t-low-priority/

I get the sense YOU think most of the American public don't care, but in fact most do.


Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
187. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
4:22 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
JeffMasters has created a new entry.
186. DeepSeaRising
4:08 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 184. MahFL:



How do you know this is not registering with most Americans ?
Also remember this is one State out of 50, in which flooding regularly occurs, one resident was on tv yesterday and said he'd been flooded 4 times in the 1990's.


I appreciate a fine question and a good point. When we see real movement in legislation to pass binding laws that really address AGW then I will believe it's really registering. I do not believe it is with the West masses. We say pretty words but don't take the hard choice options that will change the curve we're on. We're on a runaway train and we're just barely tapped the breaks. Real binding legislation is moving at a glacial pace and they're going to be gone soon. And so will our chance to blunt AGW if we don't get real fast.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
185. Seattleite
4:08 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 180. DeepSeaRising:

What a historic rain event with Sunday putting the same area under a threat for severe weather and more heavy rains. For those affected, they painfully know just how historically out of the normal this is. I know there's an election going on, but have we become so accustomed to this new normal that an epic event like this doesn't even register with most Americans anymore? Crazy, we've never seen a set up this extreme ever before. Strongest upper level low ever producing a one in a thousand year likely rain event. Wow!


If most Americans began to pay attention to the onslaught of "epic" weather events they *might* be forced to conclude that AGW is real and is likely contributing to the epic weather. Cognitive dissonance is difficult to endure. Better to ignore it and hope it goes away...

On a weather note, it's going to rain today. Again. Also, I'm glad to hear plantmoretrees fared OK through the storm yesterday. Other than a free car wash on the 520 floating bridge, it was largely a non event in Seattle. Although I did have friends lose power in North Seattle.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
184. MahFL
3:58 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 180. DeepSeaRising:

... I know there's an election going on, but have we become so accustomed to this new normal that an epic event like this doesn't even register with most Americans anymore? ...


How do you know this is not registering with most Americans ?
Also remember this is a couple of States out of 50. Flooding regularly occurs in this part of the USA, one resident was on tv yesterday and said he'd been flooded 4 times in the 1990's.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
183. DeepSeaRising
3:57 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 178. CaribBoy:



A little early to see this too :)


Indeed. Last decade, worldwide we've seen record tornado seasons and record low tornado seasons. We've seen record snows and cold many places only to be followed by record warm winters. We've seen historic hurricane seasons and well below average seasons. We've seen record drought places only to be followed by record rains. It's worldwide. Don't be surprised at all, count on it, another record hurricane season is coming to the Atlantic basin and I think it could be this year. If not, then soon. Just my personal read on the new climate reality we find ourselves in. It's one of extremes and getting more so. And it's faster and faster now.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
182. Grothar
3:55 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
181. washingtonian115
3:53 PM GMT on March 11, 2016

This is from the abandoned six flags in New Orleans.It has been abandoned now for 10 going on to 11 years.It was submerged under 8 feet of water for a month and stands as a painful reminder of what happened on the east side of the city which was especially hit hard during Katrina.The swamp is now reclaiming it with some parts of the park underwater and overgrown with vegetation.Wild boars along with snakes and alligators call the place home now.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
180. DeepSeaRising
3:42 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
What a historic rain event with Sunday putting the same area under a threat for severe weather and more heavy rains. For those affected, they painfully know just how historically out of the normal this is. I know there's an election going on, but have we become so accustomed to this new normal that an epic event like this doesn't even register with most Americans anymore? Crazy, we've never seen a set up this extreme ever before. Strongest upper level low ever producing a one in a thousand year likely rain event. Wow!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
179. 62901IL
3:29 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
This map says I only got 0.95 inches.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
178. CaribBoy
2:34 PM GMT on March 11, 2016


A little early to see this too :)
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
177. hydrus
2:23 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
174. weathermanwannabe
1:46 PM GMT on March 11, 2016

We are all praying for you folks in Louisiana and Mississippi this morning :



Absolutely.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
176. tkeith
2:01 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 161. beell:

AREA FORECAST DISCUSSION...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HOUSTON/GALVESTON TX
459 AM CST FRI MAR 11 2016

...THE UPPER FLOW WILL BECOME MORE WEST-SOUTHWESTERLY DURING THE FIRST OF THE UPCOMING WEEK. THIS WILL HELP PROMOTE A WARMING TREND WITH LITTLE CLOUDS BEING COUPLED WITH A SOUTHWESTERLY LOW-LEVEL FLOW AS SEEN BY THE ECWMF 850 MB FORECASTS ON MONDAY AND TUESDAY...

Some sunshine in the forecast for SE TX next week under a canopy of cumulus minusculus. We have had some large ones overhead this week.

It's about time for a BEELL sighting. It appears the rumors of your demise were greatly exaggerated...
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
175. Pastey
1:48 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Starting to get some slack in the rain. Last night saw a couple of heavy downpours. Rivers/creeks are way up in my area but most roads are still passable in the Baton Rouge area. Had to cross one section of road that had about 6-8" of standing water this morning. Not sure when we're due to crest here but getting home may prove to be difficult this afternoon if I had to guess.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
174. weathermanwannabe
1:46 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
We are all praying for you folks in Louisiana and Mississippi this morning :



Southern Mississippi Valley sector loop

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
173. weathermanwannabe
1:42 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Good Morning. The Mexican low is finally on the move but slowly rotating to the N-NE at a snails pace. Not only does Louisiana continue to be pummeled, but the moisture trail now has expanded into large bands flowing North from the Yucatan with some convective activity in the Gulf as they move on-shore due to the warmer sst's in the Eastern Half of the Gulf of Mexico.

Note that the ULL plume in the middle of the Gulf coincides (right next to) with the large warm Gulf eddy; that baroclinic interaction between the two is fueling the off-shore t-storms this morning.

Also note that the current trajectory is right up the spine of the Mississippi River; this is going to cause massive flooding downstream well into next week; no real relief in sight for several days when all is said and done.

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
172. yonzabam
1:20 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 160. BaltimoreBrian:

Astronomers say they've found the biggest structure in the universe and they named it the BOSS


Bruce Springsteen may be a big star, but he's not that big.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
171. StormTrackerScott
1:12 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 109. Bucsboltsfan:



What about the dry sinking/stable air that has dominated the past couple of years. That has been the main issue and you didn't address it?


I agree, the cold pool across the far North Atlantic could cause problems as warm anomalies set up from the 20N up to 50N while the Caribbean cools compared to further north and this is showing up on models that are showing La-Nina. This is a difficult forecast for this Hurricane Season.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
170. tampabaymatt
1:10 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
169. tampabaymatt
1:09 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
168. tampabaymatt
1:08 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
167. LargoFl
12:47 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
166. HadesGodWyvern (Mod)
12:46 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
157

Link please?


Link
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
165. LargoFl
12:42 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
2 more days......................NWS New Orleans..................
Detailed Forecast



Today

Showers and thunderstorms. Some of the storms could produce heavy rain. High near 72. Southeast wind around 15 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New rainfall amounts between 3 and 4 inches possible.


Tonight

Showers and thunderstorms. Some of the storms could produce heavy rain. Low around 67. Southeast wind around 15 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New rainfall amounts between 1 and 2 inches possible.


Saturday

Showers and thunderstorms. Some of the storms could produce heavy rain. High near 73. Southeast wind around 15 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New rainfall amounts between 1 and 2 inches possible.


Saturday Night

A 30 percent chance of showers before midnight. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 63. Southwest wind around 10 mph.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
164. LargoFl
12:37 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Gee I sure hope this doesn't verify..way out in time but, those poor flooded out folks there..
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
163. Andrebrooks
12:35 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Near a foot has fallen here in Hammond, Louisiana. Schools, businesses, government, and the city of Hammond are closed. People are getting rescued, power is out in places. Please pray for us.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
162. MahFL
12:31 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
Lake Shasta continues to fill :

69% of Total Capacity
91% of Historical Avg. For This Date.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
161. beell
12:26 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
AREA FORECAST DISCUSSION...CORRECTED
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE HOUSTON/GALVESTON TX
459 AM CST FRI MAR 11 2016

...THE UPPER FLOW WILL BECOME MORE WEST-SOUTHWESTERLY DURING THE FIRST OF THE UPCOMING WEEK. THIS WILL HELP PROMOTE A WARMING TREND WITH LITTLE CLOUDS BEING COUPLED WITH A SOUTHWESTERLY LOW-LEVEL FLOW AS SEEN BY THE ECWMF 850 MB FORECASTS ON MONDAY AND TUESDAY...

Some sunshine in the forecast for SE TX next week under a canopy of cumulus minusculus. We have had some large ones overhead this week.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
160. BaltimoreBrian
12:08 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
159. LargoFl
12:01 PM GMT on March 11, 2016
stay alert and safe folks over there............................................. ........
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
158. islander101010
11:42 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
long summer ahead. not only are we a little worried about an uptick in hurricane activity but also the spread of zika. it seems as if there is no stopping it.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
157. tiggerhurricanes2001
11:11 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 107. washingtonian115:

A little to early to see this eh?


Link please?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
156. Andrebrooks
10:15 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
9 inches of rain has fallen now. Expect some wicked winds from that line southwest of me.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
155. Andrebrooks
10:06 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 154. HurricaneHunterJoe:



Looks like it will be coming down for a while yet!
It's been coming down since 1:30pm yesterday.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
154. HurricaneHunterJoe
10:04 AM GMT on March 11, 2016


Looks like it will be coming down for a while yet!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
153. Andrebrooks
9:52 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 151. HurricaneHunterJoe:



Im with you on that........hope ALL stay safe! Boy, that's a whole lotta rain! Also hope the tornados are kept to a minimum!
Right.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
152. HurricaneHunterJoe
9:49 AM GMT on March 11, 2016


A winter weather system will race over Southern California Friday night bringing rain, mountain snow and gusty winds. The precipitation will begin late Friday afternoon in western San Bernardino and Orange Counties, then spread southeast Friday evening. The storm will exit the region early Saturday morning.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
151. HurricaneHunterJoe
9:44 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 149. Andrebrooks:

True. Lol. But I do hope everyone be safe from this weather.


Im with you on that........hope ALL stay safe! Boy, that's a whole lotta rain! Also hope the tornados are kept to a minimum!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
150. HurricaneHunterJoe
9:43 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
149. Andrebrooks
9:34 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
True. Lol. But I do hope everyone be safe from this weather.
Quoting 148. HurricaneHunterJoe:


Well, you wanted some El Nino weather! I just hope everyone heeds the warnings and get out or do as requested by local emergency organizations and keep loss of life as low as possible! Again, be safe Andre!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
148. HurricaneHunterJoe
9:32 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 146. Andrebrooks:

Thanks Joe. We are over 8 inches of rain now. Rescues are being conducted in my city.

Well, you wanted some El Nino weather! I just hope everyone heeds the warnings and get out or do as requested by local emergency organizations and keep loss of life as low as possible! Again, be safe Andre!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
147. HurricaneHunterJoe
9:28 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 138. PedleyCA:


Not likely, The forecast is for .31" of rain. Doubt we will need an ARK for that.


Let's hope the models are wrong and we get more than forecast! When the models are wrong, we usually get shortchanged...........I think it's about time to go the other way....let's hope the front/trof slows or stalls over us and we get 1.31"!

Jan 2016-7.10"
Feb 2016-0.04
Mar 2016-0.86 so far
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
146. Andrebrooks
9:27 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 143. HurricaneHunterJoe:



Be SAFE and good luck Andre!
Thanks Joe. We are over 8 inches of rain now. Rescues are being conducted in my city.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
145. HurricaneHunterJoe
9:24 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 132. BayFog:

Although the current synoptic chart is showing the front already south of us, the satellite and ground truth says otherwise. Local wind and wavering pressure patterns, plus the radar point to the front having become stationary with waves along it right thru the heart of the Bay Area, at least over the last several hours.



All is good........keep it coming til that hose busts!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
144. HurricaneHunterJoe
9:21 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 138. PedleyCA:


Not likely, The forecast is for .31" of rain. Doubt we will need an ARK for that.


Maybe a rubber dinghy!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
143. HurricaneHunterJoe
9:20 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 142. Andrebrooks:

Flash flood emergency is in effect for my parish you guys. Please pray for my area and home. We've seen close to 8 inches now. We could see over 13 inches of rain.


Be SAFE and good luck Andre!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
142. Andrebrooks
8:29 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Flash flood emergency is in effect for my parish you guys. Please pray for my area and home. We've seen close to 8 inches now. We could see over 13 inches of rain.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
141. Patrap
7:44 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
140. Patrap
7:37 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Was a epic trip up to Baton Rouge for the show there, then came home by Midnight....thru some crazy rain rates near Gramercy on I-10 eastbound.

Glad to back in Nola safe and sound.







Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
139. Dakster
6:41 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Maybe get a sandbag ready -- just in case you need to sprinkle some on top of the puddle that could form.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
138. PedleyCA
6:40 AM GMT on March 11, 2016
Quoting 137. Dakster:



Flooding issues in SoCal for you Ped?

Not likely, The forecast is for .31" of rain. Doubt we will need an ARK for that.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:

Viewing: 188 - 138

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4Blog Index

Top of Page

Category 6™

About

Cat 6 lead authors: WU cofounder Dr. Jeff Masters (right), who flew w/NOAA Hurricane Hunters 1986-1990, & WU meteorologist Bob Henson, @bhensonweather