El Niño-Related Rains Take Aim on California--and Arkansas

By: Dr. Jeff Masters , 2:19 PM GMT on March 04, 2016

The Pacific wave train set to bring a much-anticipated storm to the West Coast this weekend looks like it has a second destination in mind. Parts of the south-central U.S., especially Arkansas, are in line for what could be some of their heaviest March rains on record next week, once the Pacific storm cuts off and settles in for a spell.

Lower-elevation rains and mountain snows will push inland on Friday and Saturday from Washington to central California as the powerful Pacific jet stream slams into the coast. Initially, snow levels will be on the high side across the Sierra Nevada--above 7000 feet on Saturday--but as colder air filters in, the snow level will drop to the 3500-5000 foot range, which is good news for replenishing the critical Sierra snowpack. Many parts of the Sierra will receive one to two feet of snow by Monday, with even more across the higher peaks. As the jet stream continues plowing inland, a second wave at its base should goose the rains and mountain snows across southern California, which has missed out on many of this winter’s wet storms. Coastal SoCal can expect widespread 1-2” amounts, with 2-4” possible in the San Francisco Bay area.


Figure 1. The latest weekly U.S. Drought Monitor shows that as of March 1, more than 38% of California remains in exceptional drought (D4, the worst category). This is only marginally better than the 40% coverage from one year ago this week. Some improvement can be expected over the next week or two. Image credit: National Drought Mitigation Center.


The Los Angeles area needs more than 6” of rain just to catch up to what an average wet season would have produced by now, much less a strong El Niño winter. In a blog post late Thursday, Daniel Swain (California Weather Blog) was cautiously optimistic: “…it appears increasingly likely that March will at least be able to make a dent--even though it’s quite clear that California’s multi-year drought will persist through the summer.”

The follow-up storm for late next week that we discussed in our Wednesday post isn’t looking quite as potent in recent model runs, but as Swain noted, “Present model solutions still suggest a storm that would be quite impressive by the low standards set during recent drought winters.”


Figure 2. Rainfall projected for the 7-day period ending at 7:00 am EST Friday, March 11, 2016. Image credit: NOAA/NWS Weather Prediction Center

Next stop: Southern Plains
In classic El Niño fashion, the Pacific jet stream will dip to uncommonly low latitudes as it move inland. By midweek, the jet will have carved out an upper-level low in northern Mexico (see Figure 3 below). At that point, its progress will be halted by strong upper ridging over the eastern U.S. In between, this will allow for extremely rich tropical moisture to flow northward from the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico into the lower Mississippi Valley. The amount of precipitable water in this air mass is projected to surpass record levels for March in some areas.

A stationary front expected to lie from Texas toward Illinois will become the focus of multiple rounds of heavy showers and thunderstorms over several days. Some severe weather could emerge, including tornadoes, although the set-up looks less like a prolific twister producer and more like a torrential rainmaker. The focal point is likely to be Arkansas, where the stationary front should be aligned near or just east of the Ozarks. This would help enhance uplift and set the stage for what could eventually pose a serious flooding threat. The 00Z Friday run of the GFS model dumped 8” to 12” of rain over most of the southeast half of Arkansas over the ten days ending on Sunday, March 13. A secondary peak of 8" or more could develop in parts of Louisiana. Such a forecast is quite plausible, given the very moist air mass expected and given the fact that upper-level lows often move even more slowly than expected. March is the most common month for river floods across the southeast U.S., and heavy spring rains are a hallmark of El Niño in this region.

In records going back to 1876, Little Rock, AR, has never seen a March with more than 10.43” of rain (set in 1897). If the ingredients come together as models suggest, Little Rock could approach that record before the month is even half over.


Figure 3. WunderMap depiction of upper-level flow at the 200-mb level (around 34,000 feet) from the 0Z Friday GFS model projection valid at 10:00 am EST Thursday, March 10. Wind speeds are shown in knots; multiply by 1.15 for mph.


Mexico could also see unusual weather next week as the strong upper low dives into place. An upper-level trough extended far into Mexico during mid-December 1997, near the peak of the “super” El Niño of 1997-98. That month brought Guadalajara its first snowfall since 1881 and Monterrey its first snow in 30 years. Next week’s upper-level low may be even stronger over northern Mexico than the one in December 1997. Lower-level temperatures won’t be as cold with this event, now that it’s early March, but at least some dabs of higher-elevation snow are possible.

Bob Henson

PS from Jeff and Bob: Last call for blog-name suggestions!
We’ve had great fun sifting through more than 100 potential new names for this blog submitted in the comments section for last Friday’s post. As we explained, we’re renaming the blog to better reflect our joint authorship. The ideal would be a cool, pithy name that reflects the spirit of the blog in covering both weather and climate, with particular emphases on tropical meteorology, severe weather, and climate change. Our full names will serve as a subtitle, so they needn’t be part of the new blog name. Please feel free to chime in with your suggestions in the comments section of this post, or in last Friday’s post. If you’re a WU member, you can drop us a line via WU Mail. All suggestions made by March 10 will be considered. Thanks again for your creativity and enthusiasm--it is much appreciated!


Figure 4. A word cloud produced by using the titles of all 3200-plus entries posted to this blog since it was launched in 2005. Image credit: Dr. Jeff Masters.


The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Reader Comments

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509. PondonomeTheSequel
8:17 PM GMT on March 08, 2016
You want a pithy name for your blog? How about one word:

SUPERCELLIATMOSPHERICKCLIMATEBLOGADOCIOUS!

You're welcome.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
508. NativeSun
11:59 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 446. luvtogolf:



But STS said that El Nino will continue this year and even strengthen and that the Atlantic tropical season will be a bust.
Look at the source he uses, it's the worst model on the planet at predicting ENSO events.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
507. NativeSun
11:55 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 425. ricderr:




you might have missed it..but with the latest reading......this event is now on a decling pace as 97/98...it had been a slower pace...but not anymore
This Nino is toast, and we will not have another one for a least 3 years, according to the latest reliable models, this Nino will drop faster then 96/97. Hello La Nina, and where is all our rain we were suppose to have the last 6weeks or so? It was a wet winter but it was not spread out and came in large amounts over short periods of time, at least it was better than no rain.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
506. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
7:01 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
JeffMasters has created a new entry.
505. BayFog
6:43 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 501. StormTrackerScott:



Paid subscriber. Euro isn't as bullish as CFS but it did shift upwards as well. Going to be interesting to see if this trend continues going thru Spring as it was the CFS who first caught on to the 2015 Super Nino back in December 2014

The Nino this year has behaved differently than the last two, probably because of the warming of the Arctic and consequent feedbacks such as a diminished temperature contrast and/or different pressure fields. As to duration and a forecast of a La Nina, that really depends on whether or not the trade wind pattern returns to normal. If as someone else points out we continue to get westerly wind events at low latitudes, there will be no La Nina and El NIno may persist. We shall see.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
504. HurricaneHunterJoe
6:43 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 502. BayFog:


At last, moisture is entraining into the Pacific jet from the outflow of the El Nino convective mass as an upper trough reaches deep into the tropics west of Hawaii.


Do we want that now after all this snow recently?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
503. StormTrackerScott
6:40 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 502. BayFog:


At last, moisture is entraining into the Pacific jet from the outflow of the El Nino convective mass as an upper trough reaches deep into the tropics west of Hawaii.


CFS has that mass SE of Hawaii this upcoming Fall. That could be a very wet set up for California this Fall/Winter.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
502. BayFog
6:38 PM GMT on March 07, 2016

At last, moisture is entraining into the Pacific jet from the outflow of the El Nino convective mass as an upper trough reaches deep into the tropics west of Hawaii.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
501. StormTrackerScott
6:37 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 495. JRRP7:


do you have the link ?


Paid subscriber. Euro isn't as bullish as CFS but it did shift upwards as well. Going to be interesting to see if this trend continues going thru Spring as it was the CFS who first caught on to the 2015 Super Nino back in December 2014
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
500. BayFog
6:34 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Our Sierra reservoir has jumped the past 2 days and is now registering 84% of capacity.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
499. weathermanwannabe
6:34 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Much of that moisture out ahead of the low off the US Pacific coast is going to get drawn into the pacific jet and brought in over California and parts beyond in the coming days:






Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
498. HurricaneHunterJoe
6:32 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Shasta Lake up to 1008' -------59 feet til full--------is rising 3 feet per day currently with inflow of 38,000cfs into the lake!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
497. MahFL
6:28 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
This weekend coming Truckee, CA is forecast to get 3 feet of snow.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
496. WeatherConvoy
6:27 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
I wanted to show a graphic of hurricanes hitting the US East Coast in the last 100 years. In this graphic it shows from 1915-1965 20 MH directly impacting Florida and the East Coast. The last 50 years 1965-2015 only 8 MH directly impacting the US East Coast. So maybe we are entering a more active phase again.

If it doesn't come up on display let me know
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
495. JRRP7
6:26 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 490. StormTrackerScott:

New Euro also shifted upwards too. This is a huge change from earlier in the year.

do you have the link ?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
494. HurricaneHunterJoe
6:24 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 491. BayFog:


So were the forecasters initially. The intrusion of cold air was iffy early on, but it's come thru. Nonetheless, snow levels were quite elevated for some time before finally coming down.


Forecasters were calling for 4000' snow tonight, I had a heavier cell come thru this am and it was snowing big fatties for 20 minutes, I am at 3325' elevation.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
493. RitaEvac
6:23 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Forecasts showing lots of water coming in coming days, forecasts also calling for Trump to win Florida. We'll have too see how things play out.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
492. HurricaneHunterJoe
6:22 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Some 2 day precip totals from NWS San Diego thru 8am Pacific

Link
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
491. BayFog
6:21 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 413. calkevin77:



This is great news for CA. I was expecting this pineapple express type system to keep the snow elevations rather high, so to see those accumulations at those elevations is awesome. I will be excited to see the Drought Monitor stats a week from this Thursday.

So were the forecasters initially. The intrusion of cold air was iffy early on, but it's come thru. Nonetheless, snow levels were quite elevated for some time before finally coming down.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
490. StormTrackerScott
6:15 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
New Euro also shifted upwards too. This is a huge change from earlier in the year.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
489. WeatherConvoy
6:13 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Good morning good people. I wanted to show you a graphic from Scripps institute supporting a growing La Nina late summer into the winter of 2017. For those of you who are onboard with this or on the fence with La Nina I show you this
.
I understand it is one organization and its not gospel.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
488. HurricaneHunterJoe
6:12 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Check out snow totals......Bear Valley in Sierras at 66" last 72 hours.......Dat be some kinda NICE!

Link
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
487. StormTrackerScott
6:10 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 465. JRRP7:




The whole set of models shifted upwards. Big props to the CFSv2.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
486. StormTrackerScott
6:09 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Several models agreeing with the CFSv2 on the NMME March update. Looks like El-Nino may continue thru 2016.

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
485. HurricaneHunterJoe
6:08 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Nice line of storms has come thru.........nice rain and got heavy snow shower during passage of a heavier cell........back to rain again.

NWS was calling for snow at 4000' later today. Must have been an intense cell as my elevation is 3325'
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
484. WeatherConvoy
6:07 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 478. 62901IL:

@476-Tazmanian-here's my song about Donald Trump.

Donald Trump the Grump! Donald Trump is a Grump! His name is Donald Trump! He is a Grump! Yes! He! Is!

I want to know what Model to trust, not what Presidential Candidate.

For the record, though, I trust Bernie Sanders, He's EPIC.

Whatever you guys do, DON'T VOTE FOR TRUMP.

I stump and vote for TRUMP!!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
483. HurricaneHunterJoe
6:04 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
482. Patrap
6:01 PM GMT on March 07, 2016

Quoting 481. HurricaneHunterJoe:

SNOWING BIG FATTIES!


TWC/wu Sneaux dance
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
481. HurricaneHunterJoe
5:58 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
SNOWING BIG FATTIES!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
480. Patrap
5:46 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 475. LowerCal:

I like the looks of that. :^)


We watching the weather closely as we are driving up to Red Stick for Thursday's Show @7:30pm CDT
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
479. PedleyCA
5:40 PM GMT on March 07, 2016

Starting to get some results down by Joe...
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
477. LowerCal
5:38 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 475. LowerCal:

I like the looks of that. :^)
For me anyway. I guess you've had just about enough of that, Pat.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
475. LowerCal
5:36 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 470. Patrap:




I like the looks of that. :^)
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
474. LowerCal
5:34 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 467. PedleyCA:


Didn't see any but I thought I heard a few claps off to the SE.
Lightning and thunder for half an hour here. One clap from about .3 miles away got the dogs moving. One got off the bed. The other was checking the doors and windows to see what was going on outside.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
473. LowerCal
5:30 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 466. Patrap:

Hey LC. they really making progress on the first SLS core stage here at Michoud.



....(snip)
Sweet!
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
472. 62901IL
5:30 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
New GFS...


...and new CMC.


Which to trust?
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
471. LargoFl
5:26 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 451. weathermanwannabe:

For the history buffs; scientists digging into the rim of the potential dinosaur extinction impact crater next month:

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/03/scientists -gear-drill-ground-zero-impact-killed-dinosaurs

Chicxulub
yes I read about that awhile ago, that blast the meteor made sent debris all around the world gee...man if that..happened today omg
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
470. Patrap
5:22 PM GMT on March 07, 2016


Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
469. Patrap
5:14 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
468. iahishome
5:09 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 436. LuckySD:

Is there a chunk of this radar missing? South east of the little plus, everything just disappears.




Yes, they radar is oriented so it can see the populated areas. There is a mountain peak just South East of the radar and it can't see down toward Temecula very well. Better of looking at radar out of San Diego if you need to see what's going on in that area.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
467. PedleyCA
5:07 PM GMT on March 07, 2016

Didn't see any but I thought I heard a few claps off to the SE.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
466. Patrap
5:00 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Hey LC. they really making progress on the first SLS core stage here at Michoud.



An engine section weld confidence article is taken off the Vertical Assembly Center at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.
Credits: NASA/Michoud/Steven Seipel

Feb. 24, 2016
Tools and Talent at Michoud to Complete SLS Core Stage Welding in 2016



This will be a pinnacle year for NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, as all welding for the structural backbone of NASA's new rocket, the Space Launch System, will be completed this summer in preparation for its first flight in 2018. NASA’s first uncrewed test flight with Orion atop SLS is critical to paving the way for future flights with astronauts to deep space, including on a journey to Mars.

The structural backbone of SLS is the core stage, which will tower more than 200 feet tall and store cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that will feed the vehicle’s four RS-25 engines.

"Completing all core stage welding will be a huge milestone for our team," said Pat Whipps, SLS resident manager at Michoud. "It is something we've been working hard toward here at Michoud, and we are excited to move on to integration and other next steps in building the core stage to be ready for the first flight of SLS."

The core stage is comprised of five major structures: the forward skirt, the liquid oxygen tank, the intertank, the liquid hydrogen tank and the engine section. The core stage also will house the vehicle’s avionics, including flight computers, instrumentation, batteries, power handling, sensors and other electronics. The Boeing Company of Chicago is the prime contractor for the SLS core stage, including its avionics.

On the first SLS and Orion mission, known as Exploration Mission 1 or EM-1, SLS will launch an uncrewed Orion to a stable orbit beyond the moon to demonstrate the integrated system performance of the spacecraft and rocket. From the lunar vicinity, Orion will return to Earth to demonstrate re-entry and landing prior to a crewed flight.

The hardware being welded at Michoud will include confidence, qualification and flight components of the core stage. Confidence articles verify that weld procedures are working as planned and tooling-to-hardware interfaces are correct. It also gives the weld team experience in bringing all aspects of hardware, tooling and software together. Qualification articles closely replicate flight hardware and processing procedures. Those qualification articles are later structurally tested to ensure the vehicle design is sound. Flight hardware is just that – hardware that will fly as part of the rocket to space.

Engineers and technicians at Michoud are using six state-of-the-art welding tools for the core stage, including the world's largest spacecraft welding tool, the Vertical Assembly Center. At 170 feet tall, the Vertical Assembly Center is the last stop in welding the primary structure and is used to join domes, rings and barrels to make a completed section of the core stage.

"We faced some alignment challenges with this one-of-a-kind tool, which can happen with a machine as tall as the Vertical Assembly Center," said Joan Funk, core stage lead for the Stages Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, where the SLS Program is managed for the agency. "The NASA-Boeing Stages team resolved the issues, successfully completed tool acceptance testing and are welding confidence hardware."

"While completing primary structure welding is very important, it is just the beginning of the complex and lengthy process to build a core stage that is ready to be integrated with the rest of the vehicle," said Whipps. "This process includes cleaning, priming and proof testing (an acceptance test for the workmanship) the tanks and integrating all of the parts with the primary structure. Eventually, the primary structure with its internal components will be jointed to form the core stage at the facility."

Qualification hardware for the liquid oxygen tank, the intertank, the liquid hydrogen tank and the engine section will be shipped on the Pegasus barge for structural loads testing at the Marshall Center. Two new test stands are being built that will subject the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen tanks to loads and stresses, which ensures that the structure’s design will handle flight environments. The tests also will verify the models already in place that predict the amount of loads the core stage can withstand during launch and ascent.

The initial SLS configuration will have a minimum 70-metric-ton (77-ton) lift capability and be powered by twin boosters and four RS-25 engines. The next planned upgrade of SLS, known as Block 1B, will use a more powerful exploration upper stage for more ambitious missions with a 105-metric-ton (115-ton) lift capacity. In each configuration, SLS will continue to use the same core stage and four RS-25 engines.

For more information on SLS, visit:

www.nasa.gov/sls

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
465. JRRP7
4:58 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
464. RitaEvac
4:57 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Big rains coming for TX including Louisiana and Arkansas. Radars gonna be lit up like a Christmas tree in coming days
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
463. Patrap
4:46 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 460. LowerCal:

I use a composite and my three closest towers. A must with all the variation in terrain around here.


I bet LC, thats a good thing too.

I remember how at El Toro the Tower radar for the Base used to bounce off Saddleback Mountain to its N .

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
462. LuckySD
4:46 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 456. LowerCal:



Where are mountains relative to radar tower?

Google Maps link
Ah, good call. Didn't even think of a mountain range blocking the signal. Still, that seems like an oversight to have a solid 25% of your signal blocked by mountains. But, I guess 75% coverage is better than none.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
461. Patrap
4:44 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Congratulation's?

Average temperatures across Northern Hemisphere breach 2 degrees Celsius limit

On 3 March, the average temperature of the world’s Northern Hemisphere breached the 2 degrees Celsius above “normal” mark for the first time in recorded history.

By NEOnline/GK

For the first time in history, the average temperature of the world’s Northern Hemisphere breached the 2 degrees Celsius above “normal” mark, for a few hours, according to a report by Slate’s Future Tense.

Eric Holthaus a meteorologist who writes about weather and climate for Slate’s Future Tense wrote that as of Thursday morning the under the 2 degrees Celsius aim, agreed at the UN Paris Climate Change Conference was already breached at the Northern Hemisphere.

According to the scientists if global temperature rise above 2 degrees Celsius then it will be “dangerous” for mankind and Earth. Holthaus wrote “It’s now arrived—though very briefly—much more quickly than anticipated. This is a milestone moment for our species. Climate change deserves our greatest possible attention.”

High temperatures at the Northern Hemisphere were expected as the Arctic in particular experienced terrific warmth throughout the winter. Temperatures at the North Pole approached 0C in late December being – 30C to 35C above average.

Mark Serreze, the director of the US National Snow and Ice Data Centre, described the conditions as “absurd” and told the British Daily, The Guardian, “The heat has been unrelenting over the entire season…I’ve been studying Arctic climate for 35 years and have never seen anything like this before.”

The Guardian also spoke to Professor Michael Mann, the director of Penn State Earth System Science Centre and he said that the climate change was not due to the El Niño phenomenon. “A number of folks have done this (correlation between El Niño and increased temperature),” he said, “and come to the conclusion it (the El Niño) was responsible for less than 0.1C of the anomalous warmth. In other words, we would have set an all-time global temperature record [in 2015] even without any help from El Niño.”

Bill McKibben founder of the climate campaign 350.org, and the Schumann Distinguished Scholar in Environmental Studies at Middlebury College wrote an opinion piece at Boston Globe and said:

“The messages are clear. First, global warming is not a future threat — it’s the present reality, a menace not to our grandchildren but to our present civilizations…Second, since we’re in a hole it’s time to stop digging — literally. We’ve simply got to keep coal and oil and gas in the ground.”

Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
460. LowerCal
4:43 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
Quoting 459. Patrap:

I never use a TDRW site.


They like watching a scrambled Cable signal.


Use the mode that gives the best coverage, it is the composite close in view for me,always.
I use a composite and my three closest towers. A must with all the variation in terrain around here.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:
459. Patrap
4:38 PM GMT on March 07, 2016
I never use a TDRW site.


They like watching a scrambled Cable signal.


Use the mode that gives the best coverage, it is the composite close in view for me,always.
Member Since: December 31, 1969 Posts: Comments:

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Cat 6 lead authors: WU cofounder Dr. Jeff Masters (right), who flew w/NOAA Hurricane Hunters 1986-1990, & WU meteorologist Bob Henson, @bhensonweather