Bordonaro's Den-Watching the Tropics & Severe Weather everywhere!!

Dallas-Ft Worth Snow Round II coming 12-29-09

By: Bordonaro, 4:20 PM GMT on October 29, 2009

Weather Summary for Monday, December 28, 2009, my personal weather station located in SE Arlington, TX:

Morning Low: 28F
Afternoon High: 51F
Average: 40F
+ or - Normal: -5F

HO, HO, HO!! I hope that everyone has had a very Merry Christmas. Everyone in North Texas, young and old alike, rejoiced that 3" of snow fell on Christmas Eve at the DFW Int'l AP, here in North Texas, This is the FIRST measurable snowfall EVER on Christmas Eve, our records go back to 1898.

RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORT WORTH TX
745 PM CST THU DEC 24 2009

...RECORD DAILY MAXIMUM SNOWFALL SET AT DALLAS/FORT WORTH...

A RECORD SNOWFALL OF 3.0 INCHES WAS SET AT DFW AIRPORT TODAY. THIS
IS THE FIRST MEASURABLE SNOWFALL ON RECORD FOR CHRISTMAS EVE. TRACE
SNOWFALL AMOUNTS WERE PREVIOUSLY RECORDED ON DECEMBER 24 IN 1924...
1926...1943...1975...AND 2002.

Yes, everyone the FIRST official White Christmas for the Dallas-Ft Worth area since 1926. Yes, the last White Christmas was 83 years ago. Amazing, shocking, wonderful, bizarre and of course, beautiful white crisp snow! Christmas morning dawned white, crisp and clear. The NW wind that blew at 30-50MPH On Christmas Eve, is now a distant memory. Yes, "Santa Claus" brought me a Wireless Weather Station today, a LaCrosse WT 1910. If anyone know of weather software for this model, please send me a WU e-mail.

Link below is to the NWS Ft Worth-Dallas, TX web page, to keep track of our wild weather:
Link

Look what is next for Dallas-Ft Worth, TX everyone! Winter Weather Advisory has just been issued by NWS Dallas-Ft Worth, TX.

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORT WORTH TX
200 PM CST MON DEC 28 2009

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY FOR NORTH TEXAS FROM 9 AM TUESDAY
UNTIL 9AM WEDNESDAY NORTHWEST OF A LINE FROM
KILLEEN...HILLSBORO...SULPHUR SPRINGS...

.SNOW WILL ENTER NORTH TEXAS ON TUESDAY MORNING FROM THE SOUTHWEST
SPREADING ACROSS THE AREA. ACCUMULATIONS SHOULD RANGE FROM NEAR
TWO INCHES IN THE WEST TO A HALF INCH IN THE NORTHEAST. MUCH OF
THE AFTERNOON SNOWFALL WILL MELT EXCEPT IN WESTERN COUNTIES WHERE
TEMPERATURES WILL BE COOLER. BRIDGES AND OVERPASSES WILL LIKELY
REFREEZE OVERNIGHT TUESDAY SO CONTINUED CAUTION IS ADVISED.

TXZ091>095-100>107-115>121-129>134-141>145-156>159-290400-
/O.NEW.KFWD.WW.Y.0004.091229T1500Z-091230T1500Z/
MONTAGUE-COOKE-GRAYSON-FANNIN-LAMAR-YOUNG-JACK-WISE-DENTON-COLLIN-
HUNT-DELTA-HOPKINS-STEPHENS-PALO PINTO-PARKER-TARRANT-DALLAS-
ROCKWALL-KAUFMAN-EASTLAND-ERATH-HOOD-SOMERVELL-JOHNSON-ELLIS-
COMANCHE-MILLS-HAMILTON-BOSQUE-HILL-LAMPASAS-CORYELL-BELL-
MCLENNAN-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...BOWIE...NOCONA...GAINESVILLE...
SHERMAN...DENISON...BONHAM...PARIS...GRAHAM...OLNEY...JACKSBORO...
DECATUR...BRIDGEPORT...DENTON...LEWISVILLE...FLOWER MOUND...
THE COLONY...PLANO...GREENVILLE...COMMERCE...COOPER...
SULPHUR SPRINGS...BRECKENRIDGE...MINERAL WELLS...WEATHERFORD...
BRIAR...FORT WORTH...ARLINGTON...DALLAS...ROCKWALL...TERRELL...
KAUFMAN...FORNEY...CISCO...EASTLAND...RANGER...GORMAN...
STEPHENVILLE...DUBLIN...GRANBURY...OAK TRAIL SHORES...GLEN ROSE...
CLEBURNE...BURLESON...WAXAHACHIE...ENNIS...MIDLOTHIAN...
GLENN HEIGHTS...COMANCHE...DE LEON...GOLDTHWAITE...HAMILTON...
HICO...CLIFTON...MERIDIAN...VALLEY MILLS...HILLSBORO...LAMPASAS...
COPPERAS COVE...GATESVILLE...KILLEEN...TEMPLE...FORT HOOD...WACO
200 PM CST MON DEC 28 2009

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 9 AM TUESDAY TO 9 AM
CST WEDNESDAY...

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN FORT WORTH HAS ISSUED A WINTER
WEATHER ADVISORY FOR SNOW...WHICH IS IN EFFECT
FROM 9 AM TUESDAY TO 9 AM CST WEDNESDAY.

SNOW WILL ENTER NORTH TEXAS ON TUESDAY MORNING FROM THE SOUTHWEST
BEFORE SPREADING ACROSS THE AREA. SNOWFALL SHOULD RANGE FROM NEAR
TWO INCHES IN THE WEST TO A HALF INCH IN THE NORTHEAST. MUCH OF
THE AFTERNOON SNOWFALL WILL MELT EXCEPT IN WESTERN COUNTIES WHERE
TEMPERATURES WILL BE COOLER. BRIDGES AND OVERPASSES WILL LIKELY
REFREEZE OVERNIGHT TUESDAY SO CONTINUED CAUTION IS ADVISED.

A WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY MEANS THAT PERIODS OF WINTER
PRECIPITATION MAY CAUSE TRAVEL DIFFICULTIES. BE PREPARED FOR
SLIPPERY ROADS AND PLAN ON SOME TRAVEL DELAYS.

Brief update from NWS Dallas-Ft Worth, TX 9:24PM, 12/28/09 on tomorrow's Snow Event:

AREA FORECAST DISCUSSION
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORT WORTH TX
924 PM CST MON DEC 28 2009

.UPDATE...
THE LATEST MODEL DATA COMING IN HAS SLOWED THE APPROACHING LOW
PRESSURE SYSTEM DOWN A BIT WHICH WILL RESULT IN A SLIGHTLY LATER START
TO THE PRECIPITATION. MOST OF NORTH TEXAS...INCLUDING THE
METROPLEX... WILL PROBABLY NOT SEE ANY LIGHT SNOW UNTIL TUESDAY
AFTERNOON. TEMPERATURES TUESDAY WILL BE AT OR ABOVE FREEZING MOST
OF THE DAY. THEREFORE...TRAVEL IMPACTS WITH THIS SYSTEM SHOULD BE
MINIMAL AND THE LIGHT SNOWFALL AMOUNTS EXPECTED WILL BE CONFINED
MAINLY TO GRASSY AND ELEVATED SURFACES.

Link to the North Texas Winter Weather Briefing from NWS Dallas-Ft Worth, TX:
Link

Graphic below is courtesy of the NWS Dallas-Ft Worth, TX on our upcoming Winter Weather Event for Tuesday, December 29, 2009:



Another winter storm system will approach North Texas this evening and will move across the state during the day Tuesday. Areas of snow...possibly mixed with some light rain and sleet...will develop across west Texas during the early morning and move across North Texas during the late morning into the afternoon and evening.

Snowfall amounts of 1 to 3 inches can be expected across the western portions of North Texas...with 1 to 2 inches possible in the Metroplex and areas north to the Red River. Farther south...rain will be the primary precipitation type...although some light snow may accumulate through evening.

Remember the NWS Ft Worth-Dallas, TX is keeping an eye on some very cold Arctic/Siberian air that will move into Canada over the next 10 days. A portion of a statement they issued on December 27, 2009.

"The computers forecast a pocket of very cold air which originated in Siberia to track across the North Pole and into Northwest Canada during the next 10 days. Forecasters around the US will be monitoring this system over the next couple weeks to determine whether it will continue to move south into the country. These systems rarely move as far south as the U.S., but when they do, they bring record cold outbreaks".

CONUS-Current Conditions for the Continental United States:



Below is the NWS Dallas-Ft Worth Weather Forecast for Monday, December 28-Friday, New Years Day 2010, updated on Dec 28, 2009 @8:31AM CST:

Today: Sunny, with a high near 45. North northwest wind between 5 and 10 mph.

Tonight: Partly cloudy, with a low around 29. North northwest wind around 5 mph becoming calm.

Tuesday: Snow likely, mainly after noon. Cloudy, with a high near 38. Calm wind becoming east around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Tuesday Night: A 40 percent chance of snow. Cloudy, with a low around 31. East wind 5 to 10 mph becoming south.


Wednesday: Cloudy, with a high near 48. South wind 5 to 10 mph becoming west.

Wednesday Night: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 34. North northwest wind around 5 mph.

Thursday: A 30 percent chance of rain after noon. Cloudy, with a high near 46. North wind between 5 and 10 mph.

Thursday Night: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 29. North northwest wind between 5 and 10 mph.

New Year's Day: Sunny, with a high near 46. North northwest wind between 5 and 10 mph.

Link is an update from NCEP, concerning the "Christmas Day 2009 Storm":

Below is a link to NOAA.GOV, where you can access weather forecasts for all 50 states, Guam, Puerto Rico, USVI and American Samoa

Link

8-14 Day Outlook:




Meteorgram, a GFS Long Range Model tool for forecasting 8-16 days into the future. Please note, models forecast > 7 days have limited reliability:



Latest Jet Stream Forecast Map, compliments of Dr. M and the WU Crew:

The big feature, the Polar Jet moving into the Upper Midwest. The old upper level Low from the Christmas Day storm is moving in Quebec. Second feature, the Sub-Tropical Jet moving across Baja California and across the Southern states, is carrying an upper air distubance across the Baja Peninsula into Northern Mexico.



Compliments of NOAA/SPC in Norman, OK, shows the Current Weather Watches and Warnings for locations in the Continental US:

Winter Storm Watches out for the Texas Big Counrty, SW TX, the Northeast. Freeze Warnings for portions of North and North Central Florida, Air Stagnation Advisories for W WA state and parts of ID.



Thankfully, no severe weather watches or warnings anywhere in the US.

Compliments of NOAA/SPC activity map for the lower 48, with an NWS Radar overlay:



Notice the large, sprawling area of High Pressure over Siberia. A large chunk of this will move into Canada and the rest of the Continental US over the next 10-21 days. Be prepared for an extended cold snap.

A "birds eye" view of the N. Hemisphere's Surface Weather Map, compliments of NWS Ocean Weather Prediction Division:



This link will show you all the Severe Weather Reports around the US, compliments of the NWS, Western Region Headquarters in Salt Lake City, UT:
Link

Below is the latest radar loop for the Southern Plains, compliments of the NWS, Ft. Worth-Dallas, TX:



Below is the latest radar loop for the SE US, compliments of the NWS, Nashville, TN:



It looks like the next 3 weeks will bring some very interesting weather to North Texas. I'll be following this closely and providing updates on a daily basis.

North Texans should take the basic cold weather precautions, such as covering outside water faucets, turn your sprinkler systems off, make sure your automobiles have the appropriate amount of coolant, make sure outdoor pets have a warm place to sleep out of the elements or bring them indoors.

As always, may peace be with everyone, may everyone be blessed. Thanks for stopping by my blog :0).

Peace,
Bob Bordonaro

TN Fall Weather Awareness Day & a possible stormy Gulf Coast Winter?

By: Bordonaro, 8:31 PM GMT on October 26, 2009

Good day to everyone. Although the current weather (@2PM CDT, 10-26-09) in Nashville, TN, is a Sunny and very pleasantly mild 66F, with a light SE breeze at 5 MPH, with low humidity! Seems like a "normal mid-fall afternoon.

Below is the current observations weather map for the SE US, compliments of the NWS Nashville, TN office. Hit the "refresh" icon on your computer, as the map automatically updates:



Below is the current Jet Stream Map compliments of Dr. M and WU:



Below is the US map with all the current watches/warnings compliments of NOAA/SPC:



Below is the US Radar, along withe the "Current Severe Weather Outlook", compliments of the SPC, Norman, OK:



"Birds-Eye view" of the World Surface Weather Map, compliments of the NWS Ocean Prediction Center:




November is just around the corner! I learned that November tornadoes occur in TN with regularity due to the changing of the season.

But why, isn't winter supposed to end the severe weather threat? The answer is no, not necessarily! In November, colder Arctic/Canadian air masses are sent south, due to the Polar Jet, normally bring cold/cool conditions to many areas E of the Rocky Mt's. The coldest air first gets thrust into the N Great Plains, Midwest and then the Southern Great Plains. The boundary between the air masses helps to develop an area of L pressure over the Four-Corners area of the US, where the Polar Jet usually curves NE ward over the MS and TN river valleys into the Northeast.

At same time, most commonly in an El Nino cycle, the Sub-tropical jet shoots warm, humid air into the Southern US from the Central Pacific, just to the south of the Polar Jet. This adds a very warm, unstable air into the area of L pressure. As the area of L pressure travels NE ward, a warm front develops, bringing Gulf of Mexico and Pacific moisture into the Southern Plains and SE ahead of the Cold front. The trailing cold front forces the warm, moist, unstable air to rise rapidly. This process is aided by the Polar Jet moving NE ward and the Sub-Tropical Jet moving E ward, creating an area of convergence, or a large area of rising air.

To add insult to injury, winds change directions with height, dangerous wind shear is present. As the winds at the surface, ahead of the cold front are S or SE (moist & warm), at the mid-levels the winds are W of SW (warm & drier), behind the cold front winds are N or NW (at all levels, dry and cold air). The titan clash at the air masses take place, being the worst where the center of the L, warm front and cold front meet. This scenario is similar to the early Spring tornado outbreaks that happen in March and April.

The NWS Nashville, TN orginally posted this on 10-21-09. I apologize for not posting earlier, but early in 10-22, the NWS temporarily removed the link. This may be very beneficial, not only for people in the Mid-South, but for folks living in the Southern US, especially those along the Gulf Coast.

Being in an El Nino weather cycle for late 2009-early/mid 2010, some NWS climatological data shows a marked increase in Gulf coast severe weather outbreaks are possible. Please note the attached link below, from the NWS Climate Prediction Center, "FAQ'S about El Nino and La Nina:

Link

Also, here's the link to the NWS Climate Prediction Center, featuring maps for the 6-10 day outlook through the 3 month long range forecasts for the US:

Link

Compliments of NWS Nashville, TN:
Fall Severe Weather Awareness Day
Wednesday, October 21, 2009


Severe weather does not obey the calendar! The picture above was from a F2 tornado that struck Dickson and Montgomery Counties on November 15, 2005. This was just one of 19 tornadoes that occurred that day. (For more information on this storm and other storm surveys,go to our Storm Surveys page)

The National Weather Service office in Nashville, Tennessee is conducting a Severe Weather Awareness Day on Wednesday, October 21, 2009. The purpose of this day is to call attention to the secondary peak severe weather season that begins in the late fall. November historically has been a very active month for severe weather and tornadoes.

November has produces 48 different tornado occurrences dating back to 1885. Some of the fall severe weather events include:

November 5 1948- An F2 tornado touches down in northwest Giles County, and travels for 7 miles, crossing into Maury County before lifting. No injuries are reported.
November 6 1885- An F2 tornado touches down near Estill Springs, resulting in 3 fatalities and 8 injuries.
November 7 1996- An F2 tornado cuts a 25 mile path across Franklin County, touching down west of Huntland. The tornado lifts near Belvidere, then skips to Dechard, Oak Grove, and Alto. There is only 1 reported injury.
November 8 1957- An F2 tornado touches down at Rebel Acres, near Pulaski, during the early morning. The twister travels northeastward for 5 miles before lifting. Amazingly, no one is injured.
November 10 2002- Middle Tennessee suffers one of its worst autumn severe weather outbreaks ever. Four tornadoes strike the Highland Rim during the early morning, with 2 fatalities in Port Royal. Then, following record high temperatures at Nashville (81) and Crossville (75), severe weather re-ignites during the late afternoon, with widespread wind damage, hail, and 8 additonal tornadoes. Lake Tansi Village, south of Crossville, is hardest hit, as a supercell produces baseball-size hail and an F3 tornado, killing 4. Two additional fatalities occur at New Union (Coffee County) as the result of two F2 tornadoes there. In addition to the 8 fatalities, 51 injuries are reported across the area. This is the 5th largest tornado outbreak in mid state history.
November 14 1951- An F2 tornado touches down briefly between the Elkton and Prospect communities in Giles County. There are no reported injuries.
November 15 2005- The second largest tornado outbreak in Middle Tennessee history produces 19 twisters across the mid state. One person is injured in Collinwood (Wayne County). This is the most tornadoes ever recorded in one day in the mid state with no fatalities.
November 18 1957- An F2 tornado cuts a 15 mile path across Fentress County, including the Armathwaite community. There is only 1 reported injury.
November 19 1906- An F2 tornado strikes the Mulberry community in Lincoln County, resulting in 8 injuries.
November 20 1900- F4 tornado cuts a devastating swath 300 yards wide and 8 miles long along the northwest edge of Columbia. Hardin, Wayne, and Lewis Counties may have had related tornado activity before the storm reached Columbia. Most deaths are in the Macedonia community, 2 miles west of Columbia, where the homes and cabins are "turned into kindling wood." The funnel was moving northeastward, heading for the center of Columbia, but turns suddenly to the north. Damage is estimated at $40,000. The tornado kills 27, and injures 75. It is the 4th deadliest tornado to ever strike Middle Tennessee. An F3 tornado kills 9 and injures 40 along a 25-mile path across Williamson, Davidson, and Rutherford Counties.
November 23 1983- An F1 tornado touches down near Hurricane Mills (Humphreys County). No one is injured.
November 26 1925- F3 tornado touches down near Charlotte (Dickson County). Two farms, six miles apart, lost buildings. Timber is downed between the two farms. On the first farm, a two story log home is blown apart. Logs were driven into the ground 100 yards away. Damage is estimated at $10,000.
1985- Wind gust of 60 mph is recorded at Nashville.
November 27 1994- An F0 tornado cuts a 2 mile path through Bumpus Mills (Stewart County). No injuries are reported.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Severe Weather and Tornadoes can and do occur during the winter months as well. Listed below are some significant events during the winter months.

December 24, 1988- F4 tornado tears a path from the Rebel Meadows area of Franklin to the Brenthaven area of Brentwood. The tornado destroys 54 homes, 13 apartment units, 31 businesses, and 6 parked airplanes. A man is killed when a roof caves in. The tornado travels 6 miles with a path width of 150 yards. There are $50 million in damages, and 7 injuries.
January 10, 1963- An F3 tornado touches down at Spring Hill (Maury County) just before midnight. The twister cuts a 4 mile path, lifting at Bethesda (Williamson County), after causing 4 injuries.
January 22, 1999- Clarksville is struck by an F3 tornado before dawn. Five persons are injured. F3 tornado also strikes Benton County, killing 1 and injuring 5. Mount Pleasant (1 N) measures 7.10" of rainfall -- its greatest one-day rainfall ever.
February 6, 1942- One person is injured near Ardmore as a pre-dawn F2 tornado rips a 6 mile path across Giles and Lincoln Counties.
February 12, 1880- A late evening F2 tornado rips a 4-mile path across the Hillsboro area of Davidson County.
February 13, 1952- F4 tornado tears through Moore and Franklin Counties, moving through or near Lois, Marble Hill, Beech Hill, Marble Plains, and Decherd. There is damage to 109 farms. Hundreds of trees are downed in Lois and Marble Hill. Over a hundred homes are damaged or destroyed in Franklin County. A church, a school, a store, and a home are destroyed at Beech Hill. Two people are killed in Marble Plains, and one more in Dechard. Storm continues into Grundy County, producing an F2 which rips a path from Monteagle to Tracy City. The damage in Monteagle is estimated at $110,000, and $90,000 in Tracy City. About 150 buildings are affected. One person is injured in each town. A total of 4 fatalities are reported in the three counties, with 46 injuries. Overall, 5 tornadoes are reported across Middle Tennessee.
Right now is the perfect time of the year to check your preparedness plans. Make sure that your NOAA Weather Radio has fresh batteries in it and it is tuned properly to the nearest NOAA Weather Radio transmitter. Make sure you have a means of receiving severe weather information, whether you are at home, work, school, or travelling. Make sure you know what you should do if threatening weather approaches.

The routine weekly test on NOAA Weather Radio will be conducted on Severe Weather Awareness Day. Media outlets will be working with the National Weather Service to publicize weather safety as well.

Additional Related Links

Middle Tennessee Tornado Database - Check out details on the all documented tornadoes that have hit Middle Tennessee since 1830, including those that have struck during the fall months.
NOAA Weather Radio - Details on all transmitters across Middle Tennessee and SAME codes that you can use to set your NOAA Weather Radio.
Flash Floods and River Floods - While tornadoes are a big threat to Middle Tennessee, flash flooding kills more people per year than any other weather hazard. Learn more information through this brochure.
Calendar of Significant Weather Events - A daily breakdown of significant weather events that occurred since 1830 for Middle Tennessee -- Very interesting!

Link below includes all the pictures and graphics from "Severe Weather Awareness Day" from the NWS Nashville, TN:
Link

Everyone just be aware of the increased risk for Severe Weather Outbreaks, not only in TN, but throughout the entire Gulf Coast region of the US this winter. When a Watch or Warning is issued by either the Storms Prediction Center (SPC) or your local NWS, please take them seriously.

Thanks for reading,
Bob Bordonaro

Weather Books, 2 AOI's, Great 10-22-09 Mid TN Weather and Weather Pics

By: Bordonaro, 11:30 PM GMT on October 22, 2009

Good afternoon/evening to all. I'm doing great, just taking some time to observe "quietly" on the Dr. M's blog, watching the discussions online concerning "94L" and following Rick and Lupit. I've been doing a little shopping on Amazon.com for weather books for my son and I, compliments of a fellow WU bloggers suggestion. Well I purchased my son 3 books; "After Ike: Aerial Views from the No-Fly Zone" (Gulf Coast Books, sponsored by Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi) by Mr. Bryan Carlile, "Hurricane IKE: A Survivor's Chronological and Contemplative Narration of the Great Storm of Galveston, 2008", by Elaine Strom and "Hurricanes and the Middle Atlantic States", by Rick Schwartz. I also purchased the last book for myself, also, as it covers 400 years or weather history, and over 400 pages of weather. Plus, the Bronx, NY was my birthplace and I grew up on Long Island.

Interesting to note 2 AOI's in the Caribbean. I was shocked when I checked the NHC website myself! My belief is that the Atlantic Hurricane season has 1 or 2 more storms "up her sleeve". I am not a meteorologist, so I will not forecast anything, but it would not surprise me to see 1 or both of them develop into TD's within 2-4 days. It appears that both AOI's are remnant energy "left behind" by a strong cold front, that made it all the way to the Bahamas and NE Nicaragua, amazing.

That lovely cold front also brought Mid TN a touch of frost and early winter temperatures on 10/17-10/19/09:

10/17/09: H-50 L-39 AVE: 45 + or - from normal: -14
10/18/09: H-56 L-35 AVE: 46 + or - from normal: -13
10/19/09: H-64 L-33 AVE: 49 + or - from normal: -10


And talk about some great weather for a change for Mid TN today. In Nashville, TN, after a morning low of 51F, the low clouds of this morning broke for a few hours, allowing the temperatures to shoot up to 76F. Considering we've only had only 40% of the possible sunshine in 10/09, I enjoyed every minute of the Sun today. A warm SW breeze of about 10-15MPH made it a fantastic afternoon to get out and take some pictures.

Seeing that a strong, fast moving cold front will breeze through Mid TN by Noon on Friday, 10-24-09, I had to get a few shots of the sky, alright, a few dozen. Yes, I found a "digital camera" on Amazon.com, while browsing for weather books. Just love their "suggestive selling". Well I chose the Fuji S 1500 camera, 10MP, 12X zoom, plus their "cool features" makes my daughter and grandson's life "interesting". The camera arrived last night, and as of about 5PM today, I have taken over 200 pictures!

I'll be uploading new weather related pictures amongst others in my "main blog" and "photo blog" on a fairly regular basis. To my friend who e-mailed me earlier today, a million thanks, everything is alright, I wasn't banned and to all the others who were wondering, "Where's Bordonaro", I am alive and well. God bless everyone, be blessed and peace!

The Great California Oct 13-14TH Storm of 2009

By: Bordonaro, 9:18 PM GMT on October 15, 2009

Good day, a special note to my friends and fellow bloggers at WU. The 2 links posted below contains ALOT of information concerning the October 13-14TH, 2009 Storm that affected many areas of California and Nevada.

Please, IF you are using an older computer, you may not want to open those links as they may cause your computer either slow down or crash. Thanks in advance!

Link below is compliments of the NWS San Francisco/Monterey office. This is their "Experimental Local Storm Report Google Map Display", noting the Wind Gust Reports for the entire state of California. Note Hurricane Force wind gusts reached even parts of Southern California. Click on each icon for the report details.

Note the Highest Wind gusts recorded/reported were just NW of S Lake Tahoe, CA. at an impressive 129 and 135 MPH!

Link

Below is a link, compliments of NWS San Francisco/Monterey including all the "Preliminary Storm Reports", across all of California from 0000UTC 10-13-09 through 1200UTC 10-14-09. Click on each icon for the particular storm report event and details.

Link

Wow, what a storm the West Coast of the US experienced on Tuesday and Wednesday, October 13-14Th, 2009, especially the Great State Of California! What is even more amazing is that the computer models forecasted this event with remarkable accuracy, about 5 days in advance.

The storm's origin was compliments of the remnants of Super Typhoon Melor. Melor first affected much of the nation of Japan, on Thursday October 8, 2009. Japan received 86MPH sustained winds at landfall, with gusts over 100MPH, causing several deaths, over 100 injuries, disrupting millions of Japanese commuters during their morning rush hour. Wind damage was even reported in the city of Tokyo. Preliminary reports from Japan indicate approximately $1.5 billion (USD) in insured damages. With over 400 structures damaged, and over 75 million people in it's path, per preliminary reports from Bloomberg News dated October 9, 2009.

The Sub-Tropical Jet Stream picked up the extra tropical remnants of Melor, tropical moisture and all and literally carried it across the NW Pacific Ocean, aiming a Jet Stream Max of up to 150KTS right towards the Central California coast. As the Jet Max approached the Western US, the strong Jet undercut the ridge of High pressure over the area. This created an area of Low pressure, developing a Parent Low in the NE Pacific, off the Oregon coast, later deepening the system from 987MB on Monday, October 12 to 963MB on early Wednesday, October 14, 2009.

The end result was a much needed rain-maker for the drought stricken state of California. The heaviest rainfall lasted between 12-18 hours, with greater than 1.5 inch/hour rainfall reported in certain areas. Widespread rainfall totals in the 2-4 inch range were common along the Central California coast/valleys, 4-7 inches on the Central California's coastal range, with amounts over 16 inches in some locations. The community of Mining Ridge, in Monterey Co. reported a Whopping 21.34 inches of rain. At this time, I believe this is considered an unofficial report, because it has not been verified by the NWS in San Francisco/Monterey. Most flooding was minor, however there were scattered areas of moderate/severe flooding reported. Morgan Hill received severe flooding as almost 8 inches of rain fell over that community.

Heavy mountain snow fell on the highest peaks of the Sierra Nevada, estimated at 2 to 4 feet. Even normally desert Reno, NV reported over 1.6 inches of rain during the storm. Impressive because they are on the "lee side" or "rain Shadow" side of the mountain. The moisture laden air rises and drops most of the rain/snow on the Western Sierra Nevada, usually leaving Nevada high and dry. The descending air on the "lee side" of the Sierra Nevada warms and dries, resulting in much less precipitation. However, so much Tropical moisture was fed into the storm, compliments of the Sub-Tropical Jet Stream.

Please see the below information, compliments of NWS San Francisco/Monterey:

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT...CORRECTED REMOVED MINING RIDGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SAN FRANCISCO CA
845 AM PDT WED OCT 14 2009

...PRELIMINARY RAINFALL TOTALS AND WIND GUSTS...

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRELIMINARY RAINFALL TOTALS IN INCHES FOR THIS
EVENT THROUGH 1200 AM THIS MORNING.

.SONOMA COUNTY
SONOMA COUNTY AIRPORT............. 3.16
VNOC1 VENADO 1260`................ 5.68
HWKC1 HAWKEYE RAWS 2024`.......... 4.22

.NAPA COUNTY
NAPA COUNTY AIRPORT............... 3.65
MSHC1 MOUNT ST HELENA 4140`....... 4.16
ANGC1 ANGWIN 1715`................ 4.56
NAPC1 ATLAS PEAK 1680`............ 4.80

.MARIN COUNTY
SAN RAFAEL-CIVIC CENTER........... 5.70
BBEC1 BARNABY RAWS 810`........... 5.57
EYSC1 PT REYES STATION............ 4.29
MDEC1 MIDDLE PEAK RAWS 2339`...... 7.18

.SAN FRANCISCO CITY/COUNTY
SFOC1 SAN FRANCISCO DNTOWN........ 2.48

.SAN MATEO COUNTY
RWCC1 REDWOOD CITY................ 3.52
LAHC1 LA HONDA RAWS............... 4.94

.SANTA CLARA COUNTY
SAN JOSE INTL AIRPORT............. 2.33
NUQ MOFFETT FIELD AIRPORT......... 1.91
CODC1 COW RIDGE 2998`............. 3.98
MHMC1 MOUNT HAMILTON 4198`........ 4.44
UMNC1 MOUNT UMUNHUM 3090`.........13.23

.CONTRA COSTA COUNTY
CCR CONCORD AIRPORT............... 3.45
PLEC1 BRIONES RAWS 1450`.......... 4.64
LTRC1 LAS TRAMPAS RAWS 1760`...... 4.16
AGAC1 ST MARYS COLLEGE............ 5.21
VAUC1 MT DIABLO PEAK 3691`........ 5.72
PIBC1 BLACK DIAMOND RAWS.......... 4.14
VAQC1 LOS VAQUEROS RAWS........... 3.29
LVMC1 MALORY RDG RAWS 2040`....... 4.45

.ALAMEDA COUNTY
OAKLAND INTL AIRPORT.............. 2.37
OKSC1 OAKLAND SO RAWS 1184`....... 3.27
RSPC1 ROSE PEAK RAWS 3060`........ 2.61

.SAN CRUZ COUNTY
BOUC1 LAS CUMBRS PK 2760`......... 7.99
BNDC1 BEN LOMD RAWS 2630`.........10.60
BUSC1 BURRELL FIRE 1850`.......... 8.70
EKNC1 EUREKA CANYON 1700`......... 9.73
SOQC1 SOQUEL 21`.................. 4.09
CTOC1 CORRALITOS RAWS............. 7.61

.MONTEREY COUNTY
NWS MONTEREY...................... 2.38
SALINAS MUNICIPAL ARPT............ 1.65
PTPC1 POINT PINOS................. 3.62
AMSC1 ANDREW MOLERA............... 6.89
PPSC1 BIG SUR RAWS................ 9.18
FHLC1 FT HUNTER LIGGETT........... 4.86
CHWC1 CHEWS RIDGE 4905`........... 6.22
BCOC1 BLACK CONE 4661`............10.36
LOWC1 CHALK PEAK 3432`............14.41
ANPC1 ANDERSON PEAK 3368`.........13.78
TPKC1 THREE PEAKS 3362`...........16.46

THE FOLLOWING ARE MEASURED WIND GUSTS IN MPH FROM THIS RECENT EARLY
SEASON STORM.

POINT REYES LIGHTHOUSE............ 63
WOODACRE RAWS..................... 52
MIDDLE PEAK RAWS.................. 53
BIG ROCK RAWS..................... 52
SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORT............. 56
SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY.... 58
TWIN PEAKS IN SAN FRANCISCO....... 75
GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE................ 63
POINT BLUNT ANGEL ISLAND.......... 77
LAS TRAMPAS RAWS.................. 60
OAKLAND NORTH RAWS................ 58
HALF MOON BAY..................... 49
LOS GATOS RAWS.................... 87
CALAVERAS ROAD RAWS............... 66
SPRING VALLEY RAWS................ 62
BEN LOMOND RAWS................... 46
CABRILLO COLLEGE.................. 51
PINNACLES RAWS.................... 52
MONTEREY AIRPORT.................. 51

Below is a list, compliments of the NWS San Francisco/Monterey dated October 14, 2009 which lists all of "Preliminary Local Storm Report" in the SF Bay area and vicinity. The list is quite impressive, as I believe this storm was one of the strongest October storms to affect California since the Columbus Day Storm of 1962. I have highlighted the Hurricane Force Wind Gusts reported:

PRELIMINARY LOCAL STORM REPORT...SUMMARY
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SAN FRANCISCO CA
725 AM PDT WED OCT 14 2009

..TIME... ...EVENT... ...CITY LOCATION... ...LAT.LON...
..DATE... ....MAG.... ..COUNTY LOCATION..ST.. ...SOURCE....
..REMARKS..

0334 AM NON-TSTM WND GST E WOODACRE RAWS 37.99N 122.64W
10/13/2009 M45.00 MPH MARIN CA MESONET

0335 AM NON-TSTM WND GST 12 WSW INVERNESS 38.00N 123.02W
10/13/2009 M46.00 MPH PZZ540 CA MESONET

0346 AM NON-TSTM WND GST 7 NW LUCIA 36.07N 121.56W
10/13/2009 M52.00 MPH MONTEREY CA MESONET

0800 AM NON-TSTM WND GST HALF MOON BAY 37.47N 122.44W
10/13/2009 M49.00 MPH SAN MATEO CA MESONET

WIND GUST AT HALF MOON BAY

0801 AM NON-TSTM WND GST 10 SE CACHAGUA NEAR THE 36.28N 121.54W
10/13/2009 M81.00 MPH MONTEREY CA MESONET

MIRA OLIVER OBSERVATION STATION AT CHEWS RIDGE ELEV. 5054
FEET.


0804 AM NON-TSTM WND GST 2 SE LA HONDA RAWS 37.29N 122.24W
10/13/2009 E40.00 MPH SAN MATEO CA TRAINED SPOTTER

0810 AM NON-TSTM WND GST 5 NNW CASTROVILLE 36.83N 121.78W
10/13/2009 E50.00 MPH MONTEREY CA TRAINED SPOTTER

5 INCHES OF WATER COVERING PORTIONS OF HIGHWAY 1

0828 AM NON-TSTM WND DMG SAN JOSE 37.30N 121.85W
10/13/2009 SANTA CLARA CA TRAINED SPOTTER

2 INCH DIAMETER TREE LIMBS DOWN

0832 AM NON-TSTM WND GST LOS GATOS RAWS 37.20N 121.95W
10/13/2009 M68.00 MPH SANTA CLARA CA MESONET

0840 AM HEAVY RAIN 6 NNE DALY CITY 37.77N 122.43W
10/13/2009 M1.00 INCH SAN FRANCISCO CA TRAINED SPOTTER

RAIN RATE OF ONE INCH AN HOUR

0840 AM HEAVY RAIN 2 NNW SAN RAFAEL 38.01N 122.52W
10/13/2009 M3.15 INCH MARIN CA TRAINED SPOTTER

RAINFALL AMOUNT THROUGH 840AM

0857 AM NON-TSTM WND GST E SANTA RITA RAWS 36.35N 120.60W
10/13/2009 M54.00 MPH SAN BENITO CA MESONET

0908 AM NON-TSTM WND GST 2 SSE NOVATO 38.07N 122.55W
10/13/2009 M59.00 MPH MARIN CA TRAINED SPOTTER

0928 AM NON-TSTM WND GST SAN FRANCISCO 37.77N 122.42W
10/13/2009 M54.00 MPH SAN FRANCISCO CA ASOS

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT - KSFO

0945 AM NON-TSTM WND GST 4 N PICO BLANCO CAMPGRO 36.40N 121.80W
10/13/2009 E69.00 MPH MONTEREY CA TRAINED SPOTTER

NO POWER AND TREES DOWN.

1007 AM NON-TSTM WND GST HERNANDEZ RAWS 36.38N 120.86W
10/13/2009 M63.00 MPH SAN BENITO CA MESONET

1017 AM NON-TSTM WND GST MT. DIABLO RAWS 37.88N 121.91W
10/13/2009 M70.00 MPH CONTRA COSTA CA MESONET

1029 AM HEAVY RAIN 5 SW PALO ALTO 37.34N 122.20W
10/13/2009 M2.32 INCH SAN MATEO CA TRAINED SPOTTER

RAINFALL TOTAL AS OF 1029. TREE BRANCHES DOWN AND CREEKS
ARE FILLING.

1030 AM NON-TSTM WND GST 2 WSW MONTEREY 36.59N 121.91W
10/13/2009 M42.00 MPH MONTEREY CA TRAINED SPOTTER

1130 AM NON-TSTM WND GST WOODACRE 38.01N 122.64W
10/13/2009 M52.00 MPH MARIN CA MESONET

PEAK WIND GUST AT WOODACRE RAWS

1130 AM NON-TSTM WND GST PINNACLES RAWS 36.47N 121.15W
10/13/2009 M52.00 MPH SAN BENITO CA MESONET

PEAK WIND AT PINNACLES RAWS

1230 PM NON-TSTM WND GST LAS TRAMPAS RAWS 37.83N 122.07W
10/13/2009 M60.00 MPH CONTRA COSTA CA MESONET

PEAK WIND GUST AT LAS TRAMPAS RAWS

1255 PM HEAVY RAIN 5 S SAN JOSE 37.24N 121.84W
10/13/2009 M2.17 INCH SANTA CLARA CA CO-OP OBSERVER

RAINFALL MEASURED IS STORM TOTAL. MINOR STREET FLOODING.

0128 PM NON-TSTM WND GST SAN BRUNO 37.62N 122.43W
10/13/2009 M62.00 MPH SAN MATEO CA ASOS

SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORT PEAK WIND GUST

0200 PM NON-TSTM WND GST SAN FRANCISCO 37.77N 122.42W
10/13/2009 M58.00 MPH SAN FRANCISCO CA MESONET

WIND GUST AT SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY

0200 PM NON-TSTM WND GST BEN LOMOND RAWS 37.13N 122.17W
10/13/2009 M46.00 MPH SANTA CRUZ CA MESONET

PEAK WIND GUST AT BEN LOMOND RAWS

0200 PM NON-TSTM WND GST SAN FRANCISCO 37.77N 122.42W
10/13/2009 M75.00 MPH SAN FRANCISCO CA MESONET

WIND GUST ON TWIN PEAKS IN SAN FRANCISCO


0219 PM HEAVY RAIN NAPA 38.30N 122.30W

10/13/2009 E0.00 INCH NAPA CA TRAINED SPOTTER

MINOR STREET FLOODING

0222 PM HEAVY RAIN 2 N SCOTTS VALLEY 37.08N 122.00W
10/13/2009 M8.00 INCH SANTA CRUZ CA TRAINED SPOTTER

RAINFALL TOTAL THROUGH 2PM WITH RAIN RATES CLOSE TO 1
INCH AN HOUR

0300 PM NON-TSTM WND GST N SAN FRANCISCO 37.77N 122.42W
10/13/2009 M63.00 MPH SAN FRANCISCO CA OFFICIAL NWS OBS

PEAK WIND GUST AT THE GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE

0300 PM NON-TSTM WND GST BIG ROCK RAWS 38.04N 122.57W
10/13/2009 M52.00 MPH MARIN CA MESONET

PEAK WIND GUST AT BIG ROCK RAWS

0305 PM HEAVY RAIN 5 NW PICO BLANCO CAMPGR 36.39N 121.88W
10/13/2009 M3.00 INCH MONTEREY CA TRAINED SPOTTER

3 INCHES OF RAIN IN THREE HOURS, WIND GUSTS TO 60 MPH

0305 PM HEAVY RAIN CUPERTINO 37.31N 122.05W
10/13/2009 M2.25 INCH SANTA CLARA CA TRAINED SPOTTER

RAINFALL TOTAL THROUGH 3PM

0330 PM NON-TSTM WND GST CALAVERAS ROAD RAWS 37.55N 121.84W
10/13/2009 M66.00 MPH ALAMEDA CA MESONET

PEAK WIND GUST AT CALAVERAS ROAD RAWS STATION

0337 PM NON-TSTM WND GST MONTEREY 36.60N 121.88W
10/13/2009 M51.00 MPH MONTEREY CA ASOS

WIND GUST AT MONTEREY AIRPORT

0400 PM NON-TSTM WND GST 1 NE SAN FRANCISCO 37.79N 122.41W
10/13/2009 M77.00 MPH SAN FRANCISCO CA OFFICIAL NWS OBS

PEAK WIND GUST AT POINT BLUNT ON ANGEL ISLAND


0419 PM NON-TSTM WND GST APTOS 36.99N 121.90W
10/13/2009 M51.00 MPH SANTA CRUZ CA MESONET

WIND GUST AT CABRILLO COLLEGE

0430 PM NON-TSTM WND GST MIDDLE PEAK RAWS 37.93N 122.59W
10/13/2009 M53.00 MPH MARIN CA MESONET

MIDDLE PEAK RAWS PEAK WIND GUST

0530 PM NON-TSTM WND GST LOS GATOS RAWS 37.20N 121.95W
10/13/2009 M87.00 MPH SANTA CLARA CA MESONET

PEAK WIND GUST AT LOS GATOS RAWS


0921 PM FLOOD 1 WSW MORGAN HILL 37.13N 121.65W
10/13/2009 SANTA CLARA CA TRAINED SPOTTER

7.71 INCHES OF RAIN IN 13 HOURS. WIDESPREAD FLOODING IN
DOWNTOWN MORGAN HILL.

This Great Storm caused moderate damage, including power outages, some flooding problems, numerous auto accidents, even an unfortunate fatality in CA, due to a Dust Storm 16 MI SE of Button Willow, CA, in Kern Co., at I-5 and SR119, at about 5:15PM PDT. Thankfully, California received some much needed rainfall and damage could have been much worse.

I hope that all affected by this storm will recover quickly from their losses and my condolences to the family that lost a loved one. A personal note of thanks to all the storm spotters in CA and NV, the NWS in San Francisco/Monterey and the NWS in Reno, NV, who shared the information I am sharing with you today.

Be blessed and peace to all,

Bob Bordonaro

About Ft Worth, TX & TN weather. Why it's been so rainy in TN this fall and more!

By: Bordonaro, 3:25 PM GMT on October 11, 2009

Good morning everyone, I'm Bob Bordonaro, an avid weather watcher for over 41 yrs. I am not a meteorologist, although I'd like to help spread the news about our weather, share some of my Native TX wild weather stories. Much of my information is compliments of my real life experiences, our great meteorologists here in Nashville, TN, at the National Weather Service office, from fellow novice weather bloggers here on Weather Underground and private meteorologists associated with Weather Underground.

I spent about 30 years in the Dallas-Ft. Worth Metroplex, a sprawling 8 county metropolitan area encompassing about 6.2 million people.
Weather there is wild and wacky. Weather in the DFW, TX area is about 7F warmer than here, with an average yearly temperature near 66F. They receive on average 36 in. of rain a year, with late Feb-early Jun being their rainy season, with about 16 in. of rainfall in that time period.
Winters are mild with the Jan. ave. temp. of 44F. In the Dec-mid Mar period, there is not a "true winter" to speak of. You can have winter one day (20-45F) and mid spring weather the next (60F-75F). And yes it even reached 90F in Mar, once every 5 yrs. or so! Occasional cold spells, with temps as low as 20F (please stop laughing), but it was -1F on 12-24-89. The calendar may say "winter" but, it can warm up into the 70's and 80's in Jan and Feb. Every year a Lil' sleet, snow or freezing drizzle/rain to make life interesting! And our average last freeze date is Mar 14Th.
Spring time in the Southern end of Tornado Alley is wild, with frequent severe weather outbreaks, including large hail, strong and damaging straight line winds and yes, occasional tornadoes. I have seen grapefruit size hail, 115 MPH straight-line winds and funnel clouds up close and personal! I remember viewing the damage in person after the Mar 2000 F2 tornado in downtown Ft Worth and the F4 damage in Arlington, TX 15 miles away, from the same parent thunderstorm. You had to be there, I truly was shocked, there is not putting what I saw into a brief blog.
Summers are just plain HOT, with almost 95 days a yr. over 90F, about 20 days average above 100F. Hot in TX is when it's over 100F!?! Summer temps average about 83F from mid-Jun through early Sept. And rain, huh, what's that? It may rain 3 times in Jul and 4 times in Aug, very dry indeed! Only 4-6 in. of rain fall in Jul and Aug, in an average year, many years, it is closer to 2 inches!
Fall is pleasant with milder temps, the rain returns, around mid Sept., with beautiful mild nights and warm to hot afternoon's. And yes it stays in the 90's at least 15 days of Sept, maybe 2 or 3 days in Oct. Even as late as Nov. In 2005, it reached 94F DFW, TX. has its average first freeze is Nov 21st, some years it arrives in mid-Dec.

I am here until at least the end of March 2010, here on personal family business. I want to thank everyone here in the Greater Nashville Metro area for making me feel right at home. Tennesseans a great people, my next door neighbor has adopted me as her own "Dad", always looking out for me, my 26 yr. old daughter and my 21 mo. old grandson.
Nashville, TN temperatures average about 59F for the year. You are sandwiched in between the cold continental winters/warm summers of the Midwest to the North and the mild continental winter/hot summers of S MS, S AL, S GA, N FL to your south. About 48 in. of rain fall here each year, with winter and spring receiving the heaviest rainfall. You are blessed here and actually have 4 distinct seasons, I haven't seen those since I grew up in NYC, NY in the 60's and 70's.
I'm going to have to get used to winter again! Here your winters are moderately cold averaging 38F in January. Unfortunately, you receive several days each year where it gets into the 0-10F range at night. Cloudy, rainy weather, with occasional black ice, sleet and a few snowflakes occur also. Hopefully I'll see the sun a couple of days a week.
Spring starts around Apr 10 or so, with your last freeze. Changeable weather, frequent rain/thunderstorms with occasional severe weather outbreaks. My daughter and I live 1 mile away from where the 4/2/09 tornado struck. Your local climatological report describes that spring here is pleasant with gradually warming temperatures.
Summer is warm and humid, occasional rain/thunderstorms, highs nudging the low 90's, lows in the low 70's, rather pleasant from what I've seen, as I arrived here on 7-25-09.
Fall is mild and usually dry, the days are mild, night are cool, rain scattered throughout the month, in a typical year. I understand your first freeze is around Oct 20 each year.
I know people in TN are wondering, "What happened to summer"? and "Do we need to start building an ark, it won't quit raining"? Well blame it on El Nino.

El Nino is the warming of the West, Central and Eastern parts of the Pacific Ocean. As this occurs, the atmosphere reacts to the changing temperatures and weather patterns change temporarily. In Late May-early July, the weather steering mechanism, called the Northern Jet Stream, a ribbon of air about 30,000 ft, usually over C Canada in summer, stayed south of its normal position and did not budge! This caused drier than normal conditions for parts of the Pacific Northwest, sending a stormy pattern through Montana, Idaho, N Dakota, S Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, New York and the New England states. They saw cooler than normal and much wetter than normal weather conditions. To the south, a ridge of High pressure settled over the Pacific Northwest, California through Texas and the Midwest. The Clockwise flow of air around High pressure caused cooler than normal conditions in the Upper Midwest and the Northeast first, then gradually, in late June, the ridge of High pressure eroded, centering itself over N TX., OK, and KS. The warm June in TN was replaced by a cooler than normal late June-early August in the TN Valley. The NW winds aloft drove several strong cool fronts into TN and the Southeast, resulting in near record/record low temperatures into TN and shower/thunderstorms throughout July.

The Jet Stream again northward, in early August, allowing a more seasonable pattern to develop around the entire US. Temperatures and precipitation levels returned to near normal in August in TN. Then in early September, the ridge of High pressure broke down and moved into the desert SW. That allowed the Northern Jet Stream to send a cool front through TX. Then, a non-tropical L developed over the Gulf of Mexico, slowly moving into TX, that slowly moved NE ward over 10 days. Then more impulses of energy got shot southward through the Midwest, into TX and then into the SE US. Then the Southern Branch of the Jet Stream sent a SW flow moisture out if the Tropical Pacific, tapping rich Gulf of Mexico moisture, producing round, after round of rain.

The end result, 11.08 inches of rain at the NWS Nashville International AP reporting site, the 2ND Wettest September since record keeping began here in 1871. Parts of TX received almost 15-20 inches of rain in September, providing major drought relief to Central and South TX. The remnants of Former Tropical system Fred increased lift over Georgia in September, causing record flooding rains, totalling up to 15+ inches or rain in 3 days.

I hope you enjoyed this blog! Be blessed and peace to all!

Bob Bordonaro


The views of the author are his/her own and do not necessarily represent the position of The Weather Company or its parent, IBM.

Bordonaro's Den-Watching the Tropics & Severe Weather everywhere!!

About Bordonaro

I am an avid weather watcher for the last 42 years. Weather has been a love of mine since I was 7. I enjoy watching the Tropics & Severe Weather.